See also: Bit, B.I.T., -bit-, bít, bịt, and bɨt

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
snaffle bit (1)
drill bit (2)
key bit (15)

Pronunciation edit

  • enPR: bĭt, IPA(key): /bɪt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English bitte, bite, from Old English bita (bit; fragment; morsel) and bite (a bite; cut), from Proto-Germanic *bitô and *bitiz; both from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split). More at bite.

Noun edit

bit (plural bits)

  1. A piece of metal placed in a horse's mouth and connected to the reins to direct the animal.
    A horse hates having a bit put in its mouth.
  2. A rotary cutting tool fitted to a drill, used to bore holes.
  3. (dated, Britain) A coin of a specified value.
    a threepenny bit
  4. (obsolete, Canada) A ten-cent piece, dime.
    • 1941, Emily Carr, chapter 10, in Klee Wyck[3]:
      The smallest coin we had in Canada in early days was a dime, worth ten cents. The Indians called this coin "a Bit". Our next coin, double in buying power and in size, was a twenty-five cent piece and this the Indians called "Two Bits".
  5. (now US) A unit of currency or coin in the Americas worth a fraction of a Spanish dollar; now specifically, an eighth of a US dollar.
    A quarter is two bits.
    • 1789, Olaudah Equiano, chapter 6, in The Interesting Narrative, volume I:
      I trusted to the Lord to be with me; and at one of our trips to St. Eustatia, a Dutch island, I bought a glass tumbler with my half bit, and when I came to Montserrat I sold it for a bit, or sixpence.
    • 1966, Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49, New York: Bantam Books, published 1976, →ISBN, page 16:
      He left after shaking her down for four bits for carrying the bags.
  6. (historical, US) In the southern and southwestern states, a small silver coin (such as the real) formerly current; commonly, one worth about 12½ cents; also, the sum of 12½ cents.
  7. A small amount of something.
    There were bits of paper all over the floor.
    Does your leg still hurt? —Just a bit now.
    I've done my bit; I expect you to do yours.
  8. (informal) Specifically, a small amount of time.
    I'll be there in a bit; I need to take care of something first.
    He was here just a bit ago, but it looks like he's stepped out.
  9. (in the plural, informal, sports) Fractions of a second.
    The 400 metres race was won in 47 seconds and bits.
  10. A portion of something.
    I'd like a big bit of cake, please.
    • 2013 July-August, Catherine Clabby, “Focus on Everything”, in American Scientist:
      Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus. [] A photo processing technique called focus stacking has changed that. Developed as a tool to electronically combine the sharpest bits of multiple digital images, focus stacking is a boon to biologists seeking full focus on a micron scale.
  11. Somewhat; something, but not very great; also used like jot and whit to express the smallest degree. See also a bit.
    Am I bored? Not a bit of it!
    • T. Hook
      My young companion was a bit of a poet.
  12. (slang) A prison sentence, especially a short one.
    • 1904, The Anamosa prison press, volume 7, Iowa. Colony of Detention at Anamosa:
      Had it not been for the influence of Mrs. Booth and Hope Hall I should still be grafting or doing a bit in some stir
    • 1916, Thomas Mott Osborne. Warden, Sing Sing Prison, N. Y., “Prison Reform”, in The Journal of sociologic medicine, volume 17, page 407:
      Before doing that I am going to tell you what was the result of my own incarceration, because I presume it may not be a secret to you, that I have done a "bit" myself, not the "bit" which the prosecuting attorney was so anxious to have me do.
    • 1994, Odie Hawkins, Lost Angeles, page 158:
      Chino didn't make me think of Dachau or that notorious joint in Angola, Louisiana, where a brother who had done a bit there told me how they used to cut the grass on the front lawn with their fingernails.
    • 2001, Andrew H. Vachss, Pain management:
      Not counting the days—that's okay for a county-time slap, but it'll make you crazy if you've got years to go on a felony bit.
  13. An excerpt of material making up part of a show, comedy routine, etc.
    His bit about video games was not nearly as entertaining as the other segments of his show.
  14. (slang) A gag or put-on; a humorous conceit, especially when insistently presented as true.
    Are you serious, or is this a bit?
  15. Short for bit part.
    She acted her bit in the opening scene.
  16. The part of a key which enters the lock and acts upon the bolt and tumblers.[1]
  17. The cutting iron of a plane.[2]
  18. The bevelled front edge of an axehead along which the cutting edge runs.
  19. (BDSM) A gag of a style similar to a bridle.
  20. (MLE) A gun.
    • 2013 December 23, Stephen Reynolds, 46:53 from the start, in Stephen Reynolds, director, Vendetta (film), spoken by Jimmy Vickers (Danny Dyer):
      JIMMY: I need to get my hands on some bits. If you’re still in the business. RONNIE (played by Nick Nevern): Oi! TROJAN (played by Jean-Paul Van Cauwelaert): Ronnie. {…} TROJAN: Now that is a SIG Sauer P226.
Synonyms edit
Antonyms edit
  • (small amount of time): while (US)
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
  • bits (genitals)
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

bit (third-person singular simple present bits, present participle bitting, simple past and past participle bitted)

  1. (transitive) To put a bridle upon; to put the bit in the mouth of (a horse).

References edit

  1. ^ Edward H[enry] Knight (1877), “Bit”, in Knight’s American Mechanical Dictionary. [], volume I (A–GAS), New York, N.Y.: Hurd and Houghton [], →OCLC.
  2. ^ Edward H[enry] Knight (1877), “Bit”, in Knight’s American Mechanical Dictionary. [], volume I (A–GAS), New York, N.Y.: Hurd and Houghton [], →OCLC.

Etymology 2 edit

See bite

Verb edit

bit

  1. simple past of bite
    Your dog bit me!
  2. (informal in US, archaic in UK) past participle of bite, bitten
    I have been bit by your dog!

Adjective edit

bit (not comparable)

  1. (chiefly in combination) Having been bitten.
    Even though he's bit, of course the zombies would still chase him.
    • 1984 July, Field & Stream, volume 89, number 3, page 24:
      Fortunately, someone who gets skeeter-bit this much may develop an immunity to the skeeter's saliva
    • 1992, Robert Lewis Taylor, The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters[4]:
      Only the year before, the conjure man had brought in the Jackson County madstone, from way over in Illinois, for a white peddler that had been dog-bit, and the man went ahead and died just the same
    • 1998, Adele Griffin, Rainy Season[5], page 121:
      He will not — he'll tell you not to be loco, climbing up trees late at night when you'll get bug-bit to death plus you can't see anything

Etymology 3 edit

Coined by John Tukey in 1946 as an abbreviation of binary digit, probably influenced by connotations of “small portion”.[1][2] First used in print 1948 by Claude Shannon.[3] Compare byte and nybble, with similar food associations.

Noun edit

bit (plural bits)

  1. (mathematics, computing) A binary digit, generally represented as a 1 or 0.
  2. (computing) The smallest unit of storage in a digital computer, consisting of a binary digit.
    Synonym: b
  3. (information theory, cryptography) Any datum that may take on one of exactly two values.
    status bits on IRC
    permission bits in a file system
  4. (information theory) A unit of measure for information entropy.
    • 2011 May 17, Lisa Grossman, “Entropy Is Universal Rule of Language”, in Wired Science[6], retrieved 2012-09-26:
      The researchers found that the original texts spanned a variety of entropy values in different languages, reflecting differences in grammar and structure.
      But strangely, the difference in entropy between the original, ordered text and the randomly scrambled text was constant across languages. This difference is a way to measure the amount of information encoded in word order, Montemurro says. The amount of information lost when they scrambled the text was about 3.5 bits per word.
  5. A microbitcoin, or a millionth of a bitcoin (0.000001 BTC).
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ “Six Receive Honorary Degrees at Princeton Commencement”, in (please provide the title of the work)[1], (please provide a date or year), archived from the original on 2002-02-09
  2. ^ (please provide the title of the work)[2], accessed 23 March 2007, archived from the original on 2007-03-03
  3. ^ Claude Shannon (July 1948), “A Mathematical Theory of Communication”, in The Bell System Technical Journal, →DOI

Anagrams edit

Azerbaijani edit

Other scripts
Cyrillic бит
Abjad بیت

Etymology edit

From Proto-Turkic *bït (louse).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bit (definite accusative biti, plural bitlər)

  1. louse

Declension edit

    Declension of bit
singular plural
nominative bit
bitlər
definite accusative biti
bitləri
dative bitə
bitlərə
locative bitdə
bitlərdə
ablative bitdən
bitlərdən
definite genitive bitin
bitlərin
    Possessive forms of bit
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) bitim bitlərim
sənin (your) bitin bitlərin
onun (his/her/its) biti bitləri
bizim (our) bitimiz bitlərimiz
sizin (your) bitiniz bitləriniz
onların (their) biti or bitləri bitləri
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) bitimi bitlərimi
sənin (your) bitini bitlərini
onun (his/her/its) bitini bitlərini
bizim (our) bitimizi bitlərimizi
sizin (your) bitinizi bitlərinizi
onların (their) bitini or bitlərini bitlərini
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) bitimə bitlərimə
sənin (your) bitinə bitlərinə
onun (his/her/its) bitinə bitlərinə
bizim (our) bitimizə bitlərimizə
sizin (your) bitinizə bitlərinizə
onların (their) bitinə or bitlərinə bitlərinə
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) bitimdə bitlərimdə
sənin (your) bitində bitlərində
onun (his/her/its) bitində bitlərində
bizim (our) bitimizdə bitlərimizdə
sizin (your) bitinizdə bitlərinizdə
onların (their) bitində or bitlərində bitlərində
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) bitimdən bitlərimdən
sənin (your) bitindən bitlərindən
onun (his/her/its) bitindən bitlərindən
bizim (our) bitimizdən bitlərimizdən
sizin (your) bitinizdən bitlərinizdən
onların (their) bitindən or bitlərindən bitlərindən
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) bitimin bitlərimin
sənin (your) bitinin bitlərinin
onun (his/her/its) bitinin bitlərinin
bizim (our) bitimizin bitlərimizin
sizin (your) bitinizin bitlərinizin
onların (their) bitinin or bitlərinin bitlərinin

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bit m (plural bits)

  1. (computing) bit

Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from English bit, from binary digit.

Noun edit

bit m inan

  1. (computing) bit
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Participle edit

bit

  1. masculine singular passive participle of bít

Further reading edit

  • bit in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • bit in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • bit in Akademický slovník cizích slov, 1995, at prirucka.ujc.cas.cz

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Ablaut of bijten.

Noun edit

bit n (plural bitten, diminutive bitje n)

  1. bit (for a working animal)
  2. bit (rotary cutting tool)
  3. mouthguard

Etymology 2 edit

From English bit.

Noun edit

bit m (plural bits, diminutive bitje n)

  1. bit (binary digit)
  2. bit (unit of storage)
  3. bit (datum with two possible values)

French edit

Etymology edit

From English.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bit m (plural bits)

  1. (computing) bit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Hungarian edit

Etymology edit

From English bit.[1]

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈbit]
  • Hyphenation: bit
  • Rhymes: -it

Noun edit

bit (plural bitek)

  1. (computing) bit (binary digit)

Declension edit

Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative bit bitek
accusative bitet biteket
dative bitnek biteknek
instrumental bittel bitekkel
causal-final bitért bitekért
translative bitté bitekké
terminative bitig bitekig
essive-formal bitként bitekként
essive-modal
inessive bitben bitekben
superessive biten biteken
adessive bitnél biteknél
illative bitbe bitekbe
sublative bitre bitekre
allative bithez bitekhez
elative bitből bitekből
delative bitről bitekről
ablative bittől bitektől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
bité biteké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
bitéi bitekéi
Possessive forms of bit
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. bitem bitjeim
2nd person sing. bited bitjeid
3rd person sing. bitje bitjei
1st person plural bitünk bitjeink
2nd person plural bitetek bitjeitek
3rd person plural bitjük bitjeik

Derived terms edit

Compound words

References edit

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Further reading edit

  • bit in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (‘A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress; published A–ez as of 2024)

Indonesian edit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈbɪt]
  • Hyphenation: bit

Etymology 1 edit

From English bit (binary digit), from Middle English bitte, bite, from Old English bita (bit; fragment; morsel) and bite (a bite; cut), from Proto-Germanic *bitô and *bitiz; both from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split).

Noun edit

bit (first-person possessive bitku, second-person possessive bitmu, third-person possessive bitnya)

  1. (computing) bit, smallest unit of storage.

Etymology 2 edit

From Dutch biet, from Middle Dutch bete, from Latin bēta.

Noun edit

bit (first-person possessive bitku, second-person possessive bitmu, third-person possessive bitnya)

  1. Beta vulgaris, common beet, beetroot, sugar beet, and chard.

Further reading edit

Karaim edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Turkic *bït.

Noun edit

bit

  1. louse

References edit

  • N. A. Baskakov, S.M. Šapšala, editor (1973), “bit”, in Karaimsko-Russko-Polʹskij Slovarʹ, Moskva, →ISBN

Khalaj edit

Perso-Arabic بیت

Etymology edit

From Proto-Turkic *bït (louse).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [bɪt], [bi(ˑ)t], [biːt]
  • (Xarrâbî) IPA(key): [bɪt], [bit]

Noun edit

bit (definite accusative bitü, plural bitlər)

  1. louse

Declension edit

References edit

  • Doerfer, Gerhard (1980) Wörterbuch des Chaladsch (Dialekt von Charrab) [Khalaj dictionary] (in German), Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó
  • Doerfer, Gerhard (1988) Grammatik des Chaladsch [Grammar of Khalaj] (in German), Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, →ISBN, →OCLC

Lashi edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bit

  1. sun

References edit

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[7], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Lower Sorbian edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

bit

  1. supine of biś

Nigerian Pidgin edit

Etymology edit

From English beat.

Verb edit

bit

  1. beat

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse biti.

Noun edit

bit m (definite singular biten, indefinite plural biter, definite plural bitene)

  1. a bit, piece (of something)
  2. a bite, mouthful (of food)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From English bit (binary digit).

Noun edit

bit m (definite singular biten, indefinite plural bit or biter, definite plural bitene)

  1. a bit (binary digit)

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bit m (definite singular biten, indefinite plural bitar, definite plural bitane)

  1. a bit, piece (of something)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English bit (binary digit).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bit m (definite singular biten, indefinite plural bit or bitar, definit plural bitane)

  1. a bit (binary digit)

Etymology 3 edit

Inherited from Old Norse bit.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bit n (definite singular bitet, indefinite plural bit, definite plural bita)

  1. a bite (e.g. insect bite, dog bite)
  2. a bite, mouthful (of food)

Etymology 4 edit

From the first person singular present indicative of Old Norse bíta, and from the second person singular imperative Old Norse bíta.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

bit

  1. inflection of bite:
    1. present
    2. imperative

References edit

Old Irish edit

Verb edit

bit

  1. third-person plural future of is

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from English bit.

Noun edit

bit m inan

  1. (mathematics, computing) bit (binary digit, generally represented as a 1 or 0)
    bit informacjia bit of information
    bit po biciebit by bit
Declension edit

The genitive singular form bita is overall less common.

Derived terms edit
adjective
Related terms edit
adjective
noun

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English beat.

Noun edit

bit m inan

  1. beat (instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music)
  2. (music) beat (rhythm signalled by a conductor or other musician to the members of a group of musicians)
Declension edit
Alternative forms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Borrowed from English drill bit.

Noun edit

bit m inan

  1. drill bit
Declension edit

Etymology 4 edit

Borrowed from English big beat.

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

bit m inan

  1. big beat (form of pop music having distorted breakbeats at a moderate tempo)
    Synonym: big-beat
    polski bitPolish big beat
Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • bit in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bit in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English bit.

Pronunciation edit

 

Noun edit

bit m (plural bits)

  1. (mathematics, computing) bit (binary digit)

Synonyms edit

  • Abbreviations: b

Coordinate terms edit

Related terms edit

  • byte (unit equivalent to 8 bits)

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bit or French bit.

Noun edit

bit m (plural biți)

  1. (computing) bit

Declension edit

Saterland Frisian edit

Etymology edit

Related to German bis.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

bit

  1. until

Preposition edit

bit

  1. until, to

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “bit”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

Scots edit

Adjective edit

bit

  1. Little.
    • 1889, Jessup Whitehead, The Steward's Handbook and Guide to Party Catering, page 439:
      A bit wee lambie
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide:
      He laid a hundred guineas with the laird of Slofferfield that he would drive four horses through the Slofferfield loch, and in the prank he had his bit chariot dung to pieces and a good mare killed.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From bȉti (to be).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bȋt f (Cyrillic spelling би̑т)

  1. essence
  2. point, meaning
Declension edit

Etymology 2 edit

From English bit.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bȉt m (Cyrillic spelling би̏т)

  1. (computing) bit
Declension edit

Slavomolisano edit

Etymology edit

From Serbo-Croatian biti, from Proto-Slavic *byti, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *bū́ˀtei, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH-.

Verb edit

bit pf or impf

  1. to be

References edit

  • Walter Breu and Giovanni Piccoli (2000), Dizionario croato molisano di Acquaviva Collecroce: Dizionario plurilingue della lingua slava della minoranza di provenienza dalmata di Acquaviva Collecroce in Provincia di Campobasso (Parte grammaticale)., pp. 409–412

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bit.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbit/ [ˈbit̪]
  • Rhymes: -it
  • Syllabification: bit

Noun edit

bit m (plural bits)

  1. bit (binary digit)

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse biti.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bit c

  1. a piece (forming a part of some whole)
    en pusselbit
    a puzzle piece
    en tårtbit / en bit tårta [note that there is no preposition]
    a piece of cake (not an idiom in Swedish – see lätt som en plätt)
    Jag åt tre bitar McNuggets
    I ate three pieces of McNuggets
    Koppen föll i golvet och gick i tusen bitar
    The cup fell to the floor and broke [went] into a thousand pieces
    torskfilé i bitar
    cod fillet cut into pieces
    1. a bit
      Actionhjälten sprängde skurkarna i bitar
      The action hero blew the bad guys to pieces/bits
  2. a bit (certain (not insignificant) distance)
    Den ligger en bit väster om byn
    It lies a bit west of the village
    Huset ligger en bit längre fram
    The house is a bit further ahead
    Det simmar en svan en bit ut på sjön
    There is a swan swimming a bit out on the lake
    Vi följde med henne en bit på vägen
    We accompanied her part of the way [We followed with her a bit on the way (to where she was going)]
    Det är en bra bit till Säffle
    It's quite a drive to Säffle ["It is a good bit to Säffle" – "bra bit" is a common collocation]
    Ta på dig vandringskängorna. Det är en bit att gå.
    Put on your hiking boots. It's a bit of a walk [a bit (implied long) to walk].
    1. way, ways, distance (when more idiomatic)
    2. (figuratively) a bit (of time)
      Vi planerar att skaffa katt en bit längre fram [can also be expressed as "lite längre fram"]
      We're planning to get a cat a bit later on ["further ahead" (longer forth) – still thought of as a distance]
  3. a tune, a piece (song)
    Synonyms: låt, sång
    en svängig bit
    a swinging tune
Usage notes edit

Del (part) is often more idiomatic when piece is interchangeable with part.

Declension edit
Declension of bit 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bit biten bitar bitarna
Genitive bits bitens bitars bitarnas
Derived terms edit
See also edit
  • del (part)
  • stycke (piece that is a fragment of something in some sense – compare stycka)

Etymology 2 edit

From English bit, from binary digit.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bit c

  1. (computing) a bit
    ett 64-bitars operativsystem
    a 64-bit [bits'] operating system
Declension edit
Declension of bit 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bit biten bitar bitarna
Genitive bits bitens bitars bitarnas

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

bit

  1. imperative of bita

References edit

Turkish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Ottoman Turkishبیت⁩, ⁧بت⁩, from Proto-Turkic *bït (louse).

Noun edit

bit (definite accusative biti, plural bitler)

  1. (zoology) louse
Declension edit
Inflection
Nominative bit
Definite accusative biti
Singular Plural
Nominative bit bitler
Definite accusative biti bitleri
Dative bite bitlere
Locative bitte bitlerde
Ablative bitten bitlerden
Genitive bitin bitlerin
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular bitim bitlerim
2nd singular bitin bitlerin
3rd singular biti bitleri
1st plural bitimiz bitlerimiz
2nd plural bitiniz bitleriniz
3rd plural bitleri bitleri
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular bitimi bitlerimi
2nd singular bitini bitlerini
3rd singular bitini bitlerini
1st plural bitimizi bitlerimizi
2nd plural bitinizi bitlerinizi
3rd plural bitlerini bitlerini
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular bitime bitlerime
2nd singular bitine bitlerine
3rd singular bitine bitlerine
1st plural bitimize bitlerimize
2nd plural bitinize bitlerinize
3rd plural bitlerine bitlerine
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular bitimde bitlerimde
2nd singular bitinde bitlerinde
3rd singular bitinde bitlerinde
1st plural bitimizde bitlerimizde
2nd plural bitinizde bitlerinizde
3rd plural bitlerinde bitlerinde
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular bitimden bitlerimden
2nd singular bitinden bitlerinden
3rd singular bitinden bitlerinden
1st plural bitimizden bitlerimizden
2nd plural bitinizden bitlerinizden
3rd plural bitlerinden bitlerinden
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular bitimin bitlerimin
2nd singular bitinin bitlerinin
3rd singular bitinin bitlerinin
1st plural bitimizin bitlerimizin
2nd plural bitinizin bitlerinizin
3rd plural bitlerinin bitlerinin
Predicative forms
Singular Plural
1st singular bitim bitlerim
2nd singular bitsin bitlersin
3rd singular bit
bittir
bitler
bitlerdir
1st plural bitiz bitleriz
2nd plural bitsiniz bitlersiniz
3rd plural bitler bitlerdir
Derived terms edit
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English bit, abbreviation of binary digit.

Noun edit

bit (definite accusative biti, plural bitler)

  1. (computing) bit
Declension edit
Inflection
Nominative bit
Definite accusative biti
Singular Plural
Nominative bit bitler
Definite accusative biti bitleri
Dative bite bitlere
Locative bitte bitlerde
Ablative bitten bitlerden
Genitive bitin bitlerin
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular bitim bitlerim
2nd singular bitin bitlerin
3rd singular biti bitleri
1st plural bitimiz bitlerimiz
2nd plural bitiniz bitleriniz
3rd plural bitleri bitleri
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular bitimi bitlerimi
2nd singular bitini bitlerini
3rd singular bitini bitlerini
1st plural bitimizi bitlerimizi
2nd plural bitinizi bitlerinizi
3rd plural bitlerini bitlerini
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular bitime bitlerime
2nd singular bitine bitlerine
3rd singular bitine bitlerine
1st plural bitimize bitlerimize
2nd plural bitinize bitlerinize
3rd plural bitlerine bitlerine
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular bitimde bitlerimde
2nd singular bitinde bitlerinde
3rd singular bitinde bitlerinde
1st plural bitimizde bitlerimizde
2nd plural bitinizde bitlerinizde
3rd plural bitlerinde bitlerinde
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular bitimden bitlerimden
2nd singular bitinden bitlerinden
3rd singular bitinden bitlerinden
1st plural bitimizden bitlerimizden
2nd plural bitinizden bitlerinizden
3rd plural bitlerinden bitlerinden
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular bitimin bitlerimin
2nd singular bitinin bitlerinin
3rd singular bitinin bitlerinin
1st plural bitimizin bitlerimizin
2nd plural bitinizin bitlerinizin
3rd plural bitlerinin bitlerinin
Predicative forms
Singular Plural
1st singular bitim bitlerim
2nd singular bitsin bitlersin
3rd singular bit
bittir
bitler
bitlerdir
1st plural bitiz bitleriz
2nd plural bitsiniz bitlersiniz
3rd plural bitler bitlerdir

Etymology 3 edit

Verb edit

bit

  1. second-person singular imperative of bitmek

Turkmen edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Turkic *bït (louse). Cognate with Old Turkic [script needed] (bit), Turkish bit (louse), etc.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bit (definite accusative bidi, plural bitler)

  1. (zoology) louse

Declension edit

Vietnamese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bit

  1. (computing) bit

Zhuang edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Tai *pitᴰ (duck). Cognate with Thai เป็ด (bpèt), Lao ເປັດ (pet), ᦵᦔᧆ (ṗed), Tai Dam ꪹꪜꪸꪒ, Shan ပဵတ်း (páet), Ahom 𑜆𑜢𑜄𑜫 (pit), Bouyei bidt, Saek ปิ๊ด. Compare Old Chinese (OC *pʰid).

Noun edit

bit (classifier duz, Sawndip forms or 𱈶 or ⿰品鳥, 1957–1982 spelling bit)

  1. duck
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Chinese (MC pit).

Noun edit

bit (classifier gaiq, Sawndip forms 𣭈 or 𰚎, 1957–1982 spelling bit)

  1. pen; pencil; writing implement

Classifier edit

bit (1957–1982 spelling bit)

  1. Classifier for sums of money and deals.

Etymology 3 edit

From Chinese (MC phjit).

Classifier edit

bit (1957–1982 spelling bit)

  1. Classifier for cloth: bolt of