English

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Etymology

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blight +‎ -er

Noun

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blighter (plural blighters)

  1. One who blights.
  2. (British, Ireland, Commonwealth, often disrespectful) A person, usually male, especially one who behaves in an objectionable or pitiable manner.
  3. A man or child, especially an annoying one.
    • 1911, Fergus Hume, chapter 10, in Red Money:
      "[I]f I had known that Pine was such a blighter as to leave me nothing, I'm hanged if I'd have allowed him to be buried in such decent company."
    • 1919, Anthony Hope, chapter 7, in The Secret of the Tower:
      He knew that the old blighter had to be humored in certain small ways.
    • 1923, P. G. Wodehouse, The Inimitable Jeeves:
      I tackled the blighter squarely.
    • 2012 March 27, David Seidler, “The King's Speech play: At last, my crowning moment...”, in The Independent, UK, retrieved 27 December 2012:
      Translation: there's still some hope for you, poor stammering blighter.

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