See also: Broder, bróder, bröder, and brøder

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *brātīr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

NounEdit

broder m (plural breder)

  1. brother

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse bróðir (brother), from Proto-Germanic *brōþēr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

broder c (singular definite broderen, plural indefinite brødre)

  1. (now formal) brother (male sibling)

Alternative formsEdit

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French brosder, from Gothic *𐌱𐍂𐌿𐌶𐌳𐍉𐌽 (*bruzdōn).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bʁɔ.de/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

broder

  1. to embroider

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English brōþor.

NounEdit

broder (plural [Term?])

  1. Alternative form of brother
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book Two Capitulum ix
      Anone after cam the knyght with the two swerdes and balan his broder / and brought with hem kynge Ryons of Northwalys and there delyuerd hym to the porters and charged hem with hym / & soo they two retorned ageyne in the daunyng of the day
      Anon after came the knight with the two swords and Balan his brother / and brought with them King Ryons of North Wales and there delivered him to the porters and charged them with him / and so the two of them returned again in the dawning of the day.

NormanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French brosder, from Gothic *𐌱𐍂𐌿𐌶𐌳𐍉𐌽 (*bruzdōn).

VerbEdit

broder (gerund brod'die)

  1. (Jersey) to embroider

Related termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse bróðir (brother), from Proto-Germanic *brōþēr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

broder m (definite singular broderen, indefinite plural brødre, definite plural brødrene)

  1. a brother
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

broder

  1. imperative of brodere

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse bróðir (brother), from Proto-Germanic *brōþēr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

NounEdit

broder m (definite singular broderen, indefinite plural brødrar, definite plural brødrane)

  1. a brother

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Gothic *𐌱𐍂𐌿𐌶𐌳𐍉𐌽 (*bruzdōn).

VerbEdit

broder

  1. to embroider

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-d, *-ds, *-dt are modified to t, z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.


SwedishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish brōþir, from Old Norse bróðir, from Proto-Germanic *brōþēr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

broder c

  1. a brother (this is the original form more commonly contracted to bror)
  2. a brother, a friar, a monk, a male member of a religious community
    Troligen har det bott 15-25 bröder samtidigt i klostret.
    The monastery has probably housed 15-25 brethren.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of broder 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative broder brodern bröder bröderna
Genitive broders broderns bröders brödernas

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit