AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch buit, from Middle Low German büte.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

buit (uncountable)

  1. The booty, spoils.

Derived termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Catalan buit, from Vulgar Latin *vŏcĭtus (compare compare Occitan voide~void~vued, Old French vuit (modern vide), Italian vuoto), itself related to vocuus, from Latin vacuus, or perhaps a participle of a Vulgar Latin verb *vŏcāre, *vŏcĕre as a variant of Latin vacō, vacāre (be empty)[1] (or alternatively a variant of vacĭtus as a participle of a *vacĕre).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

buit (feminine buida, masculine plural buits, feminine plural buides)

  1. vacant
  2. empty

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

buit m (plural buits)

  1. empty space; gap
  2. vacuum
  3. void

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ buit”, in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana, 2022

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

16th century, borrowed from Middle Low German büte, whence also German Beute and eventually all other related forms. Of uncertain ultimate origin; possibly a Celtic borrowing, from Proto-Celtic *boudi (victory, booty, spoils).[1] If so, related to the name of Boudica, a British Celtic queen.[2] [3]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

buit m (uncountable)

  1. The spoil, booty taken by violence, as in war.
  2. The loot, fruits of crime.
  3. A hunter's prey.
  4. The gains, as in a game of chance.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: buit
  • West Frisian: bût, bút

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Philippa, Marlies; Debrabandere, Frans; Quak, Arend; Schoonheim, Tanneke; van der Sijs, Nicoline (2003–2009) Etymologisch woordenboek van het Nederlands (in Dutch), Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press
  2. ^ Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (buit, supplement)
  3. ^ Rolleston, T.W. (2018): Celtic Mythology