burglar

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from British Medieval Latin burglātor, from Old French burgeor (burglar), from Medieval Latin burgātor (burglar), from burgō (to commit burglary), from Late Latin burgus (fortified town), probably from Frankish *burg (fortress), from Proto-Germanic *burgz, *burgiją (borough, watch-tower). The -l- may have been inserted under influence from Latin latro (thief).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

burglar (plural burglars)

  1. A person who breaks in to premises with the intent of committing theft
    The burglar made off with a large diamond from the museum.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

burglar (third-person singular simple present burglars, present participle burglaring, simple past and past participle burglared)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To commit burglary; to burgle.
    • 1901, Emma Orczy, The Robbery in Phillimore Terrace
      The latter, with another constable, remained to watch the burglared premises both back and front, []

See alsoEdit