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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English theft, thefte, þefte, þefþe, þiefþe, from Old English þīfþ, þȳfþ, þēoft, earlier þīefþ, þēofþ (act of thieving; theft), from Proto-Germanic *þiubiþō, from *þeubaz (thief), equivalent to thief +‎ -th or thieve +‎ -th. Cognate with Old Frisian thiuvethe, thiufthe (theft), Old Norse þýfð, þýft, and (obsolete) Dutch diefte.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

theft (countable and uncountable, plural thefts)

  1. The act of stealing property.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English þīefþ, from Proto-Germanic *þiubiþō; equivalent to thef +‎ -th.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /θeːft/, /θɛft/, /θeːfθ/, /θɛfθ/
  • (mainly southern ME) IPA(key): /θiːft/, /θift/

NounEdit

theft

  1. Theft, stealing, robbery (in general or as an individual instance)
  2. Financial fraud; the acquiring of financial goods maliciously.
  3. Some act viewed negatively compared or equated to theft.
  4. Stolen or illegally acquired goods or possessions.
  5. (rare) An alleged instance of robbery.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit