English

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Etymology 1

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From French caporal.

Noun

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caporal (uncountable)

  1. A type of shag tobacco.
    • 1928, Jean Rhys, Quartet, Penguin, published 2000, page 7:
      She had been sitting there for nearly an hour and a half, and during that time she had drunk two glasses of black coffee, smoked six caporal cigarettes and read the week's Candide.

Etymology 2

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From Spanish caporal.

Noun

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caporal (plural caporals)

  1. (Latin America) A foreman or overseer.

Anagrams

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Catalan

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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caporal m (plural caporals)

  1. (military) corporal

Further reading

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French

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Italian caporale.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ka.pɔ.ʁal/
  • Audio:(file)

Noun

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caporal m (plural caporaux, feminine caporale)

  1. (military) corporal
  2. caporal (tobacco)

Further reading

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Italian

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Noun

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caporal m (apocopated)

  1. Apocopic form of caporale

Portuguese

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French caporal, from Italian caporale, from capo (chief).[1]

Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: ca‧po‧ral

Noun

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caporal m (plural caporais)

  1. (Portugal, military) former military rank, between corporal and sergeant

Adjective

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caporal m or f (plural caporais)

  1. designating a quality of chopped tobacco

References

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  1. ^ caporal” in Dicionário infopédia da Língua Portuguesa. Porto: Porto Editora, 2003–2024.

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French caporal.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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caporal m (plural caporali)

  1. corporal

Declension

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Spanish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Italian caporale.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /kapoˈɾal/ [ka.poˈɾal]
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Syllabification: ca‧po‧ral

Noun

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caporal m (plural caporales)

  1. corporal
  2. foreman

Further reading

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