See also: Capo, capó, ĉapo, capô, and capo-

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkæ.pəʊ/, /ˈkeɪ.pou/

Etymology 1Edit

Shortening of capotasto, from Italian.

NounEdit

capo (plural capos)

  1. A movable bar placed across the fingerboard of a guitar used to raise the pitch of all strings.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Italian capo (head).

NounEdit

capo (plural capos or capi)

  1. A leader in the Mafia; a caporegime.
  2. A leader and organizer of supporters at a sporting event, particularly association football matches.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

capo

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of capar

IstriotEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin capus, from Latin caput.

NounEdit

capo m

  1. head
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 40:
      Nun o’ pioün veîsto el pioûn biel capo biondo.
      I haven’t seen a more beautiful blonde head.

SynonymsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin capus, from Latin caput, from Proto-Italic *kaput, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kauput-, *kaput-. Doublet of chef.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈka.po/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: cà‧po

NounEdit

capo m (plural capi)

  1. head
    Synonym: testa
  2. boss, chief, leader, master
  3. end (of a rope etc)
    Synonyms: fine, estremità
  4. cape (especially when capitalised in placenames)
  5. ply
  6. buddy
  7. (heraldry) chief

AdjectiveEdit

capo (invariable)

  1. head, chief, leading
    ispettore capochief inspector

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: capo
  • Spanish: capo

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kep- or *(s)kap- (to hew, cut, shovel), from a PIE substrate word that also gave Latin scapulae - see Ancient Greek κόπτω (kóptō), Ancient Greek σκάπτω (skáptō) for further cognates and discussion, as well as Proto-Indo-European *kap-. Alternatively, from another substrate word that also gave Latin caper. In both cases the vocalism requires postulating a substrate origin.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cāpō m (genitive cāpōnis); third declension

  1. a capon (castrated cockerel)
  2. (in general) a rooster

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cāpō cāpōnēs
Genitive cāpōnis cāpōnum
Dative cāpōnī cāpōnibus
Accusative cāpōnem cāpōnēs
Ablative cāpōne cāpōnibus
Vocative cāpō cāpōnēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “cāpus; scapulae”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN

Further readingEdit

  • capo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • capo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

capo

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of capar

SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Italian capo (head). Related to cabo.

NounEdit

capo m (plural capos)

  1. gangster
  2. by extension, a very able person at doing something
  3. boss, chief

Etymology 2Edit

See capar

VerbEdit

capo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of capar.

Further readingEdit