English

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Etymology

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Learned borrowing from Latin catapulta. Doublet of catapult.

Noun

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catapulta (plural catapultae or catapultæ)

  1. A Roman catapult (weapon for launching projectiles).
    • 1801, Francis Grose, chapter 12, in A History of the English Army, volume 1, page 366:
      The projectile machines, or antient artillery, used by our ancestors about the time of the Norman invasion, were the scorpion, catapulta, balista, and onager of the Romans, with divers other species of the same machines, under a variety of different appellations.
    • 1863, Thomas de Quincey, Richard Bentley and Other Writings, page 128:
      This pantomime over, Bentley recoiled, with the spring of a Roman catapulta, to his natural pursuits.
    • 1863, "An Old Cricketer", The Cricket-Bat; and how to use it, page 90:
      The catapulta was formerly an engine of war, used by the Romans for casting javelins and stones against castellated walls. A modern form of catapulta has been constructed, with a view to do away with the necessity of bowling the ball.

Catalan

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Borrowed from Latin catapulta.

Noun

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catapulta f (plural catapultes)

  1. catapult
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Verb

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catapulta

  1. inflection of catapultar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

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Corsican

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Noun

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catapulta f (plural catapulte)

  1. catapult
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Further reading

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  • catapulta” in INFCOR: Banca di dati di a lingua corsa

French

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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catapulta

  1. third-person singular past historic of catapulter

Italian

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Etymology 1

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Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Noun

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catapulta f (plural catapulte)

  1. catapult
  2. staff sling

Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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catapulta

  1. inflection of catapultare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Latin

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Ancient Greek καταπέλτης (katapéltēs).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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catapulta f (genitive catapultae); first declension

  1. a catapult

Declension

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First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative catapulta catapultae
Genitive catapultae catapultārum
Dative catapultae catapultīs
Accusative catapultam catapultās
Ablative catapultā catapultīs
Vocative catapulta catapultae
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Descendants

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References

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  • catapulta”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • catapulta”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • catapulta in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • catapulta in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • catapulta”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898), Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • catapulta”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890), A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Portuguese

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Etymology

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Learned borrowing from Latin catapulta, from Ancient Greek καταπέλτης (katapéltēs), from κατά (katá, downwards, into, against), from πάλλω (pállō, to poise or sway a missile before it is thrown).

Pronunciation

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  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ka.taˈpuw.tɐ/ [ka.taˈpuʊ̯.tɐ]
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /ka.taˈpuw.ta/ [ka.taˈpuʊ̯.ta]

  • Hyphenation: ca‧ta‧pul‧ta

Noun

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catapulta f (plural catapultas)

  1. catapult
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Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French catapulter. By surface analysis, catapultă +‎ -a.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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a catapulta (third-person singular present catapultează, past participle catapultat) 1st conj.

  1. to catapult

Conjugation

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Further reading

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Spanish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /kataˈpulta/ [ka.t̪aˈpul̪.t̪a]
  • Rhymes: -ulta
  • Syllabification: ca‧ta‧pul‧ta

Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Latin catapulta, from Ancient Greek καταπέλτης (katapéltēs).

Noun

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catapulta f (plural catapultas)

  1. catapult
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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catapulta

  1. inflection of catapultar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

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