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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from Middle English charlet, charlette (dish made from eggs, meat, milk, etc.), probably from Old French char laitée (meat with milk)[1] (see French charlotte below); or borrowed from French charlotte.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

charlotte (plural charlottes)

  1. A dessert consisting of sponge cake filled with fruit, and cream or custard.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ charlet(te, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 19 June 2018; see A[bram] Smythe Palmer (1882), “Charlotte”, in Folk-etymology: A Dictionary of Verbal Corruptions or Words Perverted in Form or Meaning, by False Derivation or Mistaken Analogy, London: George Bell and Sons, [], OCLC 23927813, page 59, column 2.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French char laitée (meat with milk):[1] char (meat) + laitée (milk); or from the female forename Charlotte.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

charlotte f (plural charlottes)

  1. charlotte (dessert)
  2. Charlotte hat, Charlotte bonnet, mob cap

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ charlet(te, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 19 June 2018; see A[bram] Smythe Palmer (1882), “Charlotte”, in Folk-etymology: A Dictionary of Verbal Corruptions or Words Perverted in Form or Meaning, by False Derivation or Mistaken Analogy, London: George Bell and Sons, [], OCLC 23927813, page 59, column 2.

Further readingEdit