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See also: chièr

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French chier, from Old French, inherited from Latin cacāre, present active infinitive of cacō, ultimately from a Proto-Indo-European root *kakka-. Doublet of caguer.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ʃje/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

chier

  1. (vulgar) to shit, defecate
  2. (transitive with on) (vulgar) to spit on, to spit at

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

chier

  1. Alternative form of chayer

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French chier.

AdjectiveEdit

chier m (feminine singular chiere, masculine plural chiers, feminine plural chieres)

  1. important, noteworthy
  2. dear, dearest

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • chier on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330-1500) (in French)

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cārus.

AdjectiveEdit

chier m (oblique and nominative feminine singular chiere)

  1. important, noteworthy
  2. dear, dearest
    • 12th or 13th century, author unknown, Le Bouchier D'Abevile:
      A Abevile ot un bouchier,
      Que si voison orent molt chier.
      In Abbeville there was a butcher
      Held in high esteem by his neighbors.
  3. expensive; costly
    • circa 1170, Wace, Le Roman de Rou:
      Itant out li Quens un present
      D'une cupe chiere d'argent
      At this moment he presented the Count
      With a valuable silver cup

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit