English

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Children.

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle English children, alteration of earlier childre ("children"; > English dialectal childer), from Old English ċildru, ċildra (children), nominative and accusative plural of ċild (child), equivalent to child +‎ -ren.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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children

  1. plural of child.
    • 2013 June 14, Jonathan Freedland, “Obama's once hip brand is now tainted”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 1, page 18:
      Now we are liberal with our innermost secrets, spraying them into the public ether with a generosity our forebears could not have imagined. Where we once sent love letters in a sealed envelope, or stuck photographs of our children in a family album, now such private material is despatched to servers and clouds operated by people we don't know and will never meet.

Anagrams

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Middle English

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Etymology

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From childre (children) with a pleonastic addition of the plural suffix -en; compare calveren, eyren, lambren.

Noun

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children

  1. plural of child