See also: chylę

English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From French, from Late Latin chȳlus, from Ancient Greek χυλός (khulós, animal or plant juice).

Noun edit

chyle (countable and uncountable, plural chyles)

  1. A digestive fluid containing fatty droplets, found in the small intestine.
    • 1857, The Confidence-Man by Herman Melville, included in The Portable North American Indian Reader, New York: Penguin Books, 1977, page 524,
      It is said that when the tidings were brought him, he was ashore sitting beneath a hemlock eating his dinner of venison - and as the tidings were told him, after the first start he kept on eating, but slowly and deliberately, chewing the wild news with the wild meat, as if both together, turned to chyle, together should sinew him to his intent.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      And we stuffing food in one hole and out behind: food, chyle, blood, dung, earth, food: have to feed it like stoking an engine.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Further reading edit

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

chyle (plural chyles)

  1. Alternative form of chile (pronunciation spelling of "child")

Anagrams edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

chyle m (plural chyles)

  1. chyle

Further reading edit

Lower Sorbian edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

chyle

  1. third-person plural present of chyliś