Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English kile, kyle, kylle, from Old Norse kýli ‎(boil), from Proto-Germanic *kūlǭ, *kūlijǭ ‎(boil), from Proto-Indo-European *gewl- ‎(vessel, bowl, ball), from Proto-Indo-European *gew-, *gū- ‎(to bend, curve, vault). Cognate with Icelandic kýli ‎(wen, boil), Swedish kula ‎(boil, bulge; pit), Danish kule ‎(boil, bump; pit), German Keule ‎(club), German Kuhle ‎(hollow), Dutch kuil ‎(pit, hole).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kile ‎(plural kiles)

  1. An ulcer; sore.

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kiːlə/, [ˈkʰiːlə]

NounEdit

kile c (singular definite kilen, plural indefinite kiler)

  1. wedge
  2. gusset

InflectionEdit

VerbEdit

kile ‎(imperative kil, infinitive at kile, present tense kiler, past tense kilede, perfect tense har kilet)

  1. wedge

KumakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French clé.

NounEdit

kile

  1. key

ReferencesEdit

  • Claire Moyse-Faurie, Borrowings from Romance languages in Oceanic languages, in Aspects of Language Contact (2008, ISBN 3110206048)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German kil; compare with German Keil.

NounEdit

kile m ‎(definite singular kilen, indefinite plural kiler, definite plural kilene)

  1. a wedge or chock

Etymology 2Edit

From the noun (sense 1); and Old Norse kitla (sense 2)

VerbEdit

kile ‎(imperative kil, present tense kiler, passive kiles, simple past kilte, past participle kilt, present tense kilende)

  1. to wedge (something)
  2. to tickle (transitive / intransitive)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German kil

NounEdit

kile m ‎(definite singular kilen, indefinite plural kilar, definite plural kilane)

  1. a wedge or chock

ReferencesEdit


SlovakEdit

NounEdit

kile

  1. locative singular of kilo

SwahiliEdit

AdjectiveEdit

kile

  1. Ki class inflected form of -le.
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