See also: Cid, CID, and cíd

LushootseedEdit

PronounEdit

-cid

  1. second-person singular patient suffix

Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Celtic *kʷid, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷid (compare *kʷis); compare Latin quid, Cornish pyth, Welsh pa.

PronounEdit

cid

  1. (interrogative) what?
    • c. 775, Táin Bó Fraích from the Book of Leinster, published in Táin bó Fraích (1974, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited by Wolfgang Meid, line 322
      "Ceist, cid do·gén-sa?" olsé ria máthair.
      "Question: what will I do?" he said before his mother.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 9c20
      cid atob·aich cen dílgud cech ancridi do·gnethe frib, et ní bethe fria acre
      what impels you pl not to forgive every injury that may have been done to you, and that you should not be about to sue [because of] it?
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 12c22
      Ro·cluinethar cách in fogur et nícon·ḟitir cid as·beir.
      Everyone hears the sound and does not know what it says.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Irish: cad
  • Scottish Gaelic: ciod
  • Manx: quoid

Etymology 2Edit

Univerbation of cía (though) +‎ is/ba (is (indicative or subjunctive))

VerbEdit

cid

  1. though… is (indicative or subjunctive)
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 14d3
      cid écen aisndís do neuch as doruid co léir, ní sechmalfaider cuimre and dano
      though it is necessary to explain carefully anything that is difficult, however brevity will not be passed by
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 92a17
      Bed indbadigthi .i. bed chuintechti .i. cid fáilte ad·cot-sa ⁊ du·ngnéu, is túsu immid·folngi dam, a Dǽ; cid indeb dano ad·cot, is tú, Dǽ, immid·folngi dam.
      To be enriched, i.e. to be sought, i.e. though it is joy that I obtain and make, it is you who effects it for me, O God; so too, though it is wealth that I obtain, it is you, God, who effects it for me.

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cid chid cid
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.