Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English is, from Old English is, from Proto-Germanic *isti (a form of Proto-Germanic *wesaną(to be)), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti(is). Cognate with West Frisian is(is), Dutch is(is), German ist(is), Old Swedish is(is). The paradigm of "to be" has been since the time of Proto-Germanic a synthesis of four originally distinct verb stems. The infinitive form "to be" is from *bʰuH-(to become). The forms is and am are derived from *h₁es-(to be) whereas the form are comes from *iraną(to rise, be quick, become active). Lastly, the past forms starting with "w-" such as was and were are from *h₂wes-(to dwell; reside).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

is

  1. third-person singular simple present indicative form of be
    He is a doctor. He retired some time ago.
    Should he do the task, it is vital that you follow him.
    It all depends on what the meaning of is is. - Bill Clinton
  2. (colloquial, nonstandard) second-person present of be

Derived termsEdit

QuotationsEdit

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

StatisticsEdit

Most common English words before 1923: he · his · with · #12: is · it · for · as

Etymology 2Edit

i +‎ -s.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

is

  1. plural of i
    remember to dot your is
Usage notesEdit
  • There is some difference of opinion regarding the use of apostrophes in the pluralization of references to letters as symbols. New Fowler's Modern English Usage, after noting that the usage has changed, states on page 602 that "after letters an apostrophe is obligatory." The 15th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style states in paragraph 7.16, "To avoid confusion, lowercase letters ... form the plural with an apostrophe and an s". The Oxford Style Manual on page 116 advocates the use of common sense.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

VerbEdit

is

  1. am, are, is (present tense, all persons, plural and singular of wees, to be)
  2. Forms the perfect passive voice when followed by a past participle

BagusaEdit

NounEdit

is

  1. woman

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

is

  1. plural of i

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse íss, from Proto-Germanic *īsą, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eyH-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

is c (singular definite isen, plural indefinite is)

  1. (uncountable) ice (water in frozen form)
  2. (uncountable) ice, ice cream (dessert, not necessarily containing cream)
  3. (countable) ice, ice cream (ice dessert on a stick or in a wafer cone)

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

is

  1. third-person singular present indicative of zijn; is, equals
    Twaalf min drie is negentwelve minus three equals nine

AdverbEdit

is

  1. (informal, dialect) Misspelling of 's.

AnagramsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

is

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐍃

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate of és(and).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

is (not comparable)

  1. also, too, as well
    Én is szeretem a csokit. - I also like chocolate. (Besides other people)
    A csokit is szeretem. - I also like chocolate. (Besides other things)
  2. even
    Három óráig is tarthat a műtét - The operation may even take three hours.
  3. (after an interrogative word) again (used in a question to ask something one has forgotten)
    Hogy is hívják? - What's that called, again?

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

(Compound words):

(Expressions):


IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From agus.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

is

  1. reduced form of agus(and; as)
    Dia is Muire duit.
    Hello to you, too. (lit. God and Virgin Mary to you.)
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 1:
      wil nə fatī xō mŭȧ, s dūŕc šē?
      conventional orthography: An bhfuil na fataí chomh maith is dúirt sé?
      Are the potatoes as good as he said?
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 1:
      ə ʒēĺǵə, l̄aurīr ə gūǵə mūn, ńī h-ønn̥̄ ī s ə ʒēlgə š agń̥ə
      conventional orthography: An Ghaeilge a labhraíthear i gCúige Mumhan, ní hionann í is an Ghaeilge seo againne.
      The Irish used in Munster isn’t the same as our Irish.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish is(is), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁es-(to be).

PronunciationEdit

ParticleEdit

is

  1. Present/future realis copula form
    Is múinteoir é Dónall.‎ ― Dónall is a teacher. (definition: predicate is indefinite)
    Is é Dónall an múinteoir.‎ ― Dónall is the teacher. (identification: predicate is definite)
    Is féidir liom snámh.‎ ― I can swim. (idiomatic noun predicate)
    Is maith liom tae.‎ ― I like tea. (idiomatic adjective predicate)
    Is mise a chonnaic é.‎ ― I'm the one who saw him. (compare Hiberno-English "'Tis I who saw him"; cleft sentence)
    Is é Dónall atá ina mhúinteoir.‎ ― It's Dónall who is a teacher. (cleft sentence)
  2. Used to introduce the comparative/superlative form of adjectives
    an buachaill is‎ ― the bigger boy; the biggest boy
    Is mó an buachaill ná Séamas.
    The boy is bigger than James.
    Is é Séamas an buachaill is mó in Éirinn!
    James is the biggest boy in Ireland! (lit. "It is James (who is) the boy (who) is biggest in Ireland")
Usage notesEdit

Used in present and future sentences for identification or definition of a subject as the person/object identified in the predicate of the sentence. Sometimes used with noun or adjective predicates, especially in certain fixed idiomatic phrases. Used to introduce cleft sentences, which are extremely common in Irish. It is not a verb.

In comparative/superlative formations, is is strictly speaking the relative of the copula, hence an buachaill is mó literally means "the boy who is biggest", i.e. "the biggest boy". The thing compared is introduced by (than).

Related termsEdit

KwerbaEdit

NounEdit

is

  1. woman

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *is, from Proto-Indo-European *éy.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

is

  1. (demonstrative) it; he (refers to a masculine word), this, that
    Is mihi rescripsit.
    He wrote back to me.
DeclensionEdit

Irregular: similar to first and second declensions, except for genitive singular ending in -ius and dative singular ending in .

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative is ea id , eae ea
genitive eius, ejus eōrum eārum eōrum
dative eīs, iīs
accusative eum eam id eōs eās ea
ablative eīs, iīs

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of (go).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

īs

  1. second-person singular present active indicative of eo

ReferencesEdit

  • is in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to sum up..: ut eorum, quae dixi, summam faciam
    • (ambiguous) those to whom we owe our being: ei, propter quos hanc lucem aspeximus
    • (ambiguous) from youth up: a puero (is), a parvo (is), a parvulo (is)
    • (ambiguous) he feels better: melius ei factum est
    • (ambiguous) Fortune's favourite: is, quem fortuna complexa est
    • (ambiguous) to sully one's fair fame: vitae splendori(em) maculas(is) aspergere
    • (ambiguous) no word escaped him: nullum verbum ex ore eius excidit (or simply ei)
    • (ambiguous) he is in a suspicious mood: suspicio ei penitus inhaeret
    • (ambiguous) the debtor: debitor, or is qui debet
    • (ambiguous) the creditor: creditor, or is cui debeo
  • is in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[2]
  • is in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • is in William Smith., editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

NavajoEdit

InterjectionEdit

is

  1. as if, as if it were true, it could be, is it really?, what do you mean by that?, so you say expressing surprise

Usage notesEdit

Usually spelled with the final letter repeated: iss, isss, issss.

Alternative formsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse íss, from Proto-Germanic *īsą, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eyH-.

NounEdit

is m ‎(definite singular isen, indefinite plural is or iser, definite plural isene)

  1. (uncountable) ice
  2. (countable) ice cream

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse íss, from Proto-Germanic *īsą, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eyH-.

NounEdit

is m ‎(definite singular isen, indefinite plural isar, definite plural isane)

  1. ice
  2. ice cream

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *īsą, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eyH-, *ey-, *ī-(ice, frost). Cognate with Old Frisian īs (West Frisian iis), Old Saxon īs (Low German Ies), Dutch ijs, Old High German īs (German Eis), Old Norse íss (Danish and Swedish is), Gothic 𐌴𐌹𐍃(eis). There are parallels in many Iranian languages, apparently from the same Indo-European root: Avestan 𐬀𐬉𐬑𐬀(aēxa-, frost, ice), Persian یخ(yakh), Pashto جح(jaḥ), Ossetian их(ix).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

īs n

  1. ice
    • the Legend of St Andrew
      Ofer eastreamas is brycgade.
      The ice formed a bridge over the streams.
  2. The runic character (/i/ or /i:/)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: is

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *īsą, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eyH-. Compare Old Saxon īs, Old English īs, Old Norse íss, Gothic 𐌴𐌹𐍃(eis).

NounEdit

īs

  1. ice

DescendantsEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

The lemma is itself is from Proto-Celtic *esti, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti; other forms are from either *h₁es- or *bʰuH-.

VerbEdit

is

  1. to be
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 14d26
      Is i persin Crist da·gníu-sa sin.
      It is in the person of Christ that I do that.

Usage notesEdit

This is the so-called "copula", which is distinct from the "substantive verb" at·tá. The copula is used with noun predicates and to introduce a cleft sentence.

ConjugationEdit

Form 1st sg. 2nd sg. 3rd sg. 1st pl. 2nd pl. 3rd pl.
Present indicative am
(relative): nonda
at, it
(relative): nonda
is
(relative): as
ammi, ammin, immi
(relative): nondan
adib, idib, adi
(relative): nondad
it
(relative): ata, at
Present subjunctive ba ba, be ba
(relative): bes, bas
bede
(relative): bete, beta
Past subjunctive bid, bith
(relative): bed, bad
bemmis betis, bitis
Imperative ba bad, bed ban, baán bad, bed bat
Future be be bid, bith bemmi, bimmi bit
Conditional robad
(relative): bed
robtis
Preterite and
imperfect indicative
basa basa ba
(relative): ba
batir, batar
(relative): batar

Derived termsEdit

  • cesu(although... is)
  • condid(so that... is)
  • in(is... ?)
  • masu(if... is)
  • (is not)

SynonymsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *it.

PronounEdit

is ‎(is)

  1. his, its
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

is

  1. third-person singular present indicative of wesan

Etymology 3Edit

From Proto-Germanic *īsą, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eyH-, *ey-, *ī-(ice, frost). Cognate with Old Frisian īs (West Frisian iis), Old English īs (English ice), Dutch ijs, Old High German īs (German Eis), Old Norse íss (Danish and Swedish is), Gothic 𐌴𐌹𐍃(eis).

NounEdit

īs n

  1. ice
  2. The runic character (/i/ or /i:/)
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle Low German: îs
    • Low German: Ies

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

is

  1. plural of i
    • 2003, J. K. Rowling, Lya Wyler, Harry Potter e a Ordem da Fênix, Rocco, page 411:
      Se você pôs os pingos nos is e cortou os tês então pode fazer o que quiser!
      If you've dotted your I's and crossed your T's, then you can do whatever you want!

ScotsEdit

AdverbEdit

is ‎(not comparable)

  1. (South Scots) as

SynonymsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

is

  1. (South Scots) as

SynonymsEdit

PronounEdit

is personal, non-emphatic

  1. (South Scots) me

See alsoEdit

  • A
  • mei (emphatic variant)

VerbEdit

is

  1. third-person singular simple present indicative form of be

See alsoEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

is

  1. and

SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

is

  1. am, are, is

Usage notesEdit

  • This defective verb doesn't have the infinitive, future tense, subjunctive or conditional moods.
  • The dependent form, used after particles, is e.
  • Is is used when linking the subject of a sentence with an object ("somebody is somebody", "somebody is something", "something is something"), otherwise forms of the verb bi are used:
    Is mise Dòmhnall.‎ ― I am Donald.
    Tha mise ann an taigh-seinnse.‎ ― I am in a pub.

Derived termsEdit


SwedishEdit

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English East.

NounEdit

is

  1. East

TurkishEdit

NounEdit

is ‎(definite accusative isi, plural isler)

  1. fume

DeclensionEdit


VolapükEdit

AdverbEdit

is

  1. here