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See also: cigār and čigar

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EnglishEdit

  cigar on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

 
Four cigars

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish cigarro, of uncertain origin; perhaps from cigarra (cicada) or from a Mayan language, see siyar (to smoke tobacco leaves).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cigar (plural cigars)

  1. Tobacco rolled and wrapped with an outer covering of tobacco leaves, intended to be smoked.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter III, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      Long after his cigar burnt bitter, he sat with eyes fixed on the blaze. When the flames at last began to flicker and subside, his lids fluttered, then drooped ; but he had lost all reckoning of time when he opened them again to find Miss Erroll in furs and ball-gown kneeling on the hearth [].
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, in The China Governess:
      A waiter brought his aperitif, which was a small scotch and soda, and as he sipped it gratefully he sighed. ¶ ‘Civilized,’ he said to Mr. Campion. ‘Humanizing.’ [] Cigars and summer days and women in big hats with swansdown face-powder, that's what it reminds me of.’

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cigar m (plural cigars)

  1. cigar

DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish cigarro.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /siɡaːr/, [siˈɡ̊ɑːˀ]

NounEdit

cigar c (singular definite cigaren, plural indefinite cigarer)

  1. cigar

InflectionEdit