Open main menu

Wiktionary β

come from a good place

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

come from a good place (third-person singular simple present comes from a good place, present participle coming from a good place, simple past and past participle came from a good place)

  1. (idiomatic) To be motivated by decency, kindness, or good intentions.
    • 2009 Dec. 12, Natasha Singer and Duff Wilson, "Menopause, as Brought to You by Big Pharma," New York Times (retrieved 1 March 2014):
      “In the 1990s, there was actually tremendous pressure to put women on hormone therapy, and it came from a good place,” Dr. Bates says.
    • 2011 July 23, Barbara Ellen, "Lucian Freud treasured the pleasures of the flesh," The Guardian/Observer (UK) (retrieved 1 March 2014):
      Ironically, this hesitation to condemn comes from a good place – the part of the British psyche that rightly prides itself on respecting other cultures.
    • 2013 Aug. 1, Claire Suddath, "Office Etiquette: The Farewell E-Mail," Businessweek (retrieved 1 March 2014):
      That gushing, glowing, 2,500-word goodbye e-mail does come from a good place. That doesn't make it a good idea.
    • 2014 Feb. 16, Nick Duerden, "Laura Mvula: ‘I don't think I'm good at being a pop star’," The Independent (UK) (retrieved 1 March 2014):
      [M]y anxiety was my body's way of trying to protect me, to look after me. So the impulse was coming from a good place.

SynonymsEdit