communion

See also: Communion

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English communion, from Old French comunion, from Ecclesiastical Latin commūniō (communion), from Latin commūnis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kəˈmjuːnjən/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: com‧mu‧nion

NounEdit

communion (countable and uncountable, plural communions)

  1. A joining together of minds or spirits; a mental connection.
    • 1981, William Irwin Thompson, The Time Falling Bodies Take to Light: Mythology, Sexuality and the Origins of Culture, London: Rider/Hutchinson & Co., page 159:
      It would be uplifting to think that the ziggurat was the first expression of Near Eastern civilization, for then one could speak about humanity's fascination with the heavens, of the human quest for communion with the infinite.
  2. (Christianity) Holy Communion.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      It is with the day of her first communion that this narrative of mine begins.
  3. (Roman Catholicism) A form of ecclesiastical unity between the Roman Church and another, so that the latter is considered part of the former.

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French comunion, borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin communio, communionem, from Latin communis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

communion f (plural communions)

  1. Communion; communion

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NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French comunion, borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin communio, communionem, from Latin communis.

NounEdit

communion f (plural communions)

  1. (Jersey) communion