See also: Union and unión

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English unyoun, from Old French union, from Late Latin ūniō, ūniōnem (oneness, unity), from Latin ūnus (one).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈjuːn.jən/, /ˈjuː.ni.ən/
  • (file)

NounEdit

union (countable and uncountable, plural unions)

  1. (countable) The act of uniting or joining two or more things into one.
  2. (countable) The state of being united or joined; a state of unity or harmony.
  3. (countable) That which is united, or made one; something formed by a combination or coalition of parts or members; a confederation; a consolidated body; a league.
  4. (countable) A trade union; a workers' union.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 22, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      In the autumn there was a row at some cement works about the unskilled labour men. A union had just been started for them and all but a few joined. One of these blacklegs was laid for by a picket and knocked out of time.
  5. (countable) An association of students at a university for social and/or political purposes; also in some cases a debating body.
  6. (countable) A joint or other connection uniting parts of machinery, such as pipes.
  7. (countable, set theory) The set containing all of the elements of two or more sets.
  8. (countable) The act or state of marriage.
  9. (uncountable, archaic, euphemistic) Sexual intercourse.
  10. (countable, programming) A data structure that can store any of various types of item, but only one at a time.
  11. (countable, now rare, archaic) A large, high-quality pearl.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition II, section 3, member 3:
      Nonius the senator hath a purple coat as stiff with jewels as his mind is full of vices; rings on his fingers worth 20,000 sesterces, and [] an union in his ear worth an hundred pounds' weight of gold []
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals, and the scene number in lowercase Roman numerals):
      And in the cup an union shall he throw, Richer than that which four successive kings In Denmark's crown have worn.
  12. (historical) An affiliation of several parishes for joint support and management of their poor; also the jointly-owned workhouse.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

union (third-person singular simple present unions, present participle unioning, simple past and past participle unioned)

  1. To combine sets using the union operation.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for union in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

See alsoEdit


AdjectiveEdit

union (comparative more union, superlative most union)

  1. Belonging to, represented by, or otherwise pertaining to a labour union.
    Actors have to be union to get work here.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin ūniō, ūniōnem (oneness, unity), from Latin ūnus (one).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

union c (singular definite unionen, plural indefinite unioner)

  1. union

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin ūniō, ūniōnem (oneness, unity), from Latin ūnus (one). Doublet of unie.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: u‧ni‧on

NounEdit

union m (plural unions)

  1. (US, obsolete) A trade union.
    Synonyms: syndicaat, vakbond

EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

union

  1. accusative singular of unio

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French union, borrowed from Late Latin ūniō, ūniōnem (oneness, unity), from Latin ūnus (one).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

union f (plural unions)

  1. union

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • German: Union

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

NounEdit

union f (plural unions)

  1. union

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin ūniō, ūniōnem (oneness, unity), from Latin ūnus (one).

NounEdit

union m (definite singular unionen, indefinite plural unioner, definite plural unionene)

  1. union (of a political nature)
    Den europeiske unionthe European Union

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin ūniō, ūniōnem (oneness, unity), from Latin ūnus (one).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

union m (definite singular unionen, indefinite plural unionar, definite plural unionane)

  1. union (a political entity consisting of two or more state that are united)
    Noreg var i union med Sverige fram til 1905.
    Norway was part of a union with Sweden until 1905.
  2. (mathematics) union (the set containing all of the elements of two or more sets.)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin ūniō, ūniōnem (oneness, unity), from Latin ūnus (one).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

union f (plural unions)

  1. union

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin ūniō, ūniōnem (oneness, unity), from Latin ūnus (one).

Proper nounEdit

union f (nominative singular union)

  1. Trinity (God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit)

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish unión, ultimately from Latin ūnus (one).

NounEdit

union

  1. union

PiedmonteseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin ūniō, ūniōnem (oneness, unity), from Latin ūnus (one).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

union f (plural union)

  1. union

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin ūniō, ūniōnem (oneness, unity), from Latin ūnus (one).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

union c

  1. union (a body with many members)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of union 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative union unionen unioner unionerna
Genitive unions unionens unioners unionernas

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin ūniō, ūniōnem (oneness, unity), from Latin ūnus (one).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

union f (invariable)

  1. union

Related termsEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

un (one) +‎ iawn (right, correct)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪnjɔn/
    Note: Despite being written as u, the vowel here is /ɪ/ in all parts of Wales.

AdjectiveEdit

union (feminine singular union, plural union, equative unioned, comparative unionach, superlative unionaf)

  1. exact

Derived termsEdit

  • unioni (to straighten; to rectify, to redress)

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
union unchanged unchanged hunion
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.