confession

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English confessioun, from Old French confession, from Latin cōnfessiō, cōnfessiōnem (confession, acknowledgment, creed or avowal of one's faith). Doublet of confessio.

Morphologically confess +‎ -ion.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kənˈfɛʃən/
  • (file)

NounEdit

 
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confession (countable and uncountable, plural confessions)

  1. The open admittance of having done something (especially something bad).
    Without the real murderer's confession, an innocent person will go to jail.
  2. A formal document providing such an admission.
    He forced me to sign a confession!
    • 1968, Conquest, Robert, The Great Terror: Stalin's Purge of the Thirties[1], Macmillan Company, LCCN 68-17513, OCLC 1169910711, OL 21272570M, page 493:
      Both the basic idea of confession, and the techniques devised by Yezhov for extracting them, however, were to receive significant employment in Asia in the 1950s. The Chinese accused the Americans of waging bacteriological warfare in Korea. The evidence they produced consisted of feathers, insects, clams, rats, and other things riddled with germs and allegedly dropped from American planes. Such evidence was not, on the face of it, very convincing - though even this was accepted by one type of Westerner. To fortify their case, the Chinese resorted to confessions, extracted from American pilots.
  3. (Christianity) The disclosure of one's sins to a priest for absolution. In the Roman Catholic Church, it is now termed the sacrament of reconciliation.
    I went to confession and now I feel much better about what I had done.
  4. Acknowledgment of belief; profession of one's faith.
  5. A formula in which the articles of faith are comprised; a creed to be assented to or signed, as a preliminary to admission to membership of a church; a confession of faith.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French confession, from Latin cōnfessiō, cōnfessiōnem (confession, acknowledgment, creed or avowal of one's faith).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

confession f (plural confessions)

  1. confession (admittance of having done something, good, bad or neutral)
  2. confession (the disclosure of one's sins to a priest for absolution)
  3. creed (a declaration of one's religious faith)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • German: Konfession
  • Romanian: confesiune

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

NounEdit

confession f (plural confessions)

  1. confession

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

confession (plural confessions)

  1. alternative form of confessioun

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cōnfessiō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

confession f (plural confessions)

  1. confession

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cōnfessiō, cōnfessiōnem.

NounEdit

confession f (oblique plural confessions, nominative singular confession, nominative plural confessions)

  1. confession (the disclosure of one's sins to a clergyman for absolution)

DescendantsEdit