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TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

sin

  1. (mathematics) A symbol of the trigonometric function sine.

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English sinne, synne, sunne, zen, from Old English synn (sin), from Proto-Germanic *sunjō (truth, excuse) and *sundī, *sundijō (sin), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁s-ónt-ih₂, from *h₁sónts ("being, true", implying a verdict of "truly guilty" against an accusation or charge), from *h₁es- (to be); compare Old English sōþ ("true"; see sooth).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: sĭn, IPA(key): /sɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

NounEdit

sin (plural sins)

  1. (theology) A violation of God's will or religious law.
    As a Christian, I think this is a sin against God.
  2. A misdeed.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess[1]:
      The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. [] The second note, the high alarum, not so familiar and always important since it indicates the paramount sin in Man's private calendar, took most of them by surprise although they had been well prepared.
  3. A sin offering; a sacrifice for sin.
    • Bible, 2 Corinthians v. 21
      He hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin.
  4. An embodiment of sin; a very wicked person.
    • William Shakespeare
      Thy ambition, / Thou scarlet sin, robbed this bewailing land / Of noble Buckingham.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

sin (third-person singular simple present sins, present participle sinning, simple past and past participle sinned)

  1. (intransitive, theology) To commit a sin.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Modification of shin.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with enPR or the IPA then please add some!
Particularly: “if the same as in Etymology 1, then put that Pron section before Etymology 1”

NounEdit

sin (plural sins)

  1. A letter of the Hebrew alphabet; שׂ
  2. A letter of the Arabic alphabet; س

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Lao ສິ້ນ (sin) or Thai ซิ่น (sîn).

 
Laotian women wearing sins

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

sin (plural sins)

  1. A traditional tube skirt worn by Lao and Thai women, particularly northern Thai and northeastern Thai women.
    • 1992, Lucretia Stewart, Tiger balm: travels in Laos, Vietnam & Cambodia, page 25:
      These dancers with their graceful upright carriage, their dreamy distant expressions and their party sins (the women were wearing sins made of brightly-coloured silk woven in squares and broad stripes and usually worn by men) were infinitely more appealing than the younger dancers and the electronic band but, as Darachit was fond of saying and without apparent regret, 'Les traditions ne sont plus respectees."
    • 2008, Robert Cooper, CultureShock! Laos: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette, →ISBN:
      After the change in regime of 1975, every woman seen in public was wearing a sin, as this was part of a dresscode favoured by the new socialist government.
    • 2009, Arne Kislenko, Culture and Customs of Laos, →ISBN, page 128:
      Communism made things even worse by eliminating the export market for locally made textiles and, in some cases, prohibiting the production of silk and the manufacture of clothes. Although traditional sins were allowed, colorful ones were considered bourgeois and banned.

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sinus. Compare Romanian sân.

NounEdit

sin n (plural sinj)

  1. breast

See alsoEdit


AsturianEdit

PrepositionEdit

sin

  1. Alternative form of ensin

BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin signum.

NounEdit

sin m

  1. sign

CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish zinc, from German Zink, related to Zinke (point, prong), from Middle High German zinke, from Old High German zinko (prong, tine), allied to zint (a jag, point), from Proto-Germanic *tindaz (prong, pinnacle), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)dont- (tooth, projection).

NounEdit

sin

  1. zinc
  2. galvanized iron sheet

CornishEdit

NounEdit

sin m (plural sînys)

  1. sign

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

sin c (neuter sit, plural sine)

  1. (reflexive possessive) third-person sg pronoun, meaning his/her/its (own)
    Han læste sin bog - He read his (own) book
    Compare: Han læste hans bog - He read his (somebody else's) book

See alsoEdit


EsperantoEdit

PronounEdit

sin

  1. accusative of si

FonEdit

NounEdit

sin

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Claire Lefebvre, Anne-Marie Brousseau, A Grammar of Fongbe (2002, →ISBN

GunEdit

NounEdit

sin

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Aspect and Modality in Kwa Languages (2006, →ISBN

HausaEdit

NounEdit

sin f

  1. Letter of the Arabic alphabet: س

HunsrikEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German sein, sīn, from Old High German sīn (to be) (with some parts from Proto-Germanic *wesaną (to be) and *beuną (to be, exist, become)), from Proto-Indo-European *es-, *h₁es- (to be, exist).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sin

  1. to be
    Ich sin en Mann.
    I am a man.
    Deer seid zu mied.
    You are too tired.

InflectionEdit

Further readingEdit


IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sin f (genitive singular sinar, nominative plural sinar)

  1. sinew, tendon

DeclensionEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish sin.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

sin

  1. (used with the definite article) that
    an buachaill sinthat boy

PronounEdit

sin

  1. that
    Sin é mo dheartháir.
    That is my brother.

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sin shin
after an, tsin
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sine.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

sin

  1. without

AntonymsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From + .

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

sīn

  1. if however, if on the contrary, but if

LivonianEdit

PronounEdit

sin

  1. singular genitive form of sinā

MenienEdit

NounEdit

sin

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Martius, Beiträge zur Ethnographie und Sprachenkunde Brasiliens, page 155

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch sin, from Proto-Germanic *sinnaz.

NounEdit

sin m, f

  1. direction
  2. attention
  3. sense, intellect, reason
  4. feeling, emotion
  5. sense, perception
  6. meaning

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • sin, sinne (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • sin (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle Low GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (originally) IPA(key): /siːn/

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Saxon sīn, from Proto-Germanic *sīnaz.

PronounEdit

sîn

  1. (personal pronoun, third person, singular, masculine, genitive) of his
    • lohant ret her Zeno hen na Verona to dem vader sin.
      John rode Sir Zeno to Verona, to the father of his.
  2. (personal pronoun, third person, singular, neuter, genitive) of it
  3. (possessive, third person, singular, masculine) his
  4. (possessive, third person, neuter, masculine) its
DeclensionEdit

Personal pronoun:

Possessive pronoun:

Alternative formsEdit

  • sîner (for the genitive of the personal pronoun)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Saxon sīn.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

sîn

  1. to be

Usage notesEdit

  • Wēsen is a verb with a suppletive conjugation based on multiple Proto-Germanic stems. For many verb forms, authors freely chose between forms based on the stems wēs- and sî-, without semantic impact. This is also true for modern Low German and Dutch. For the forms based on the sî- stem, see the respective entry at wēsen.

MiskitoEdit

AdverbEdit

sin

  1. also, too

NavajoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Athabaskan *xʸən (shaman's power, medicine, song). Related to -YĮĮD (to be holy), from Proto-Athabaskan *ɣʸən (to act as a shaman, to be endowed with supernatural powers).

Compare Ahtna sen (spiritual power, medecine), Koyukon sən (shaman's spirit), Gwich'in shan (shamanism, magic), Tlingit shí, shī, shi(n) (“sing, song”), Eyak tsį, Dena'ina shen, Galice šan (song), Lipan shį̀.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sin (possessed form biyiin)

  1. song

InflectionEdit


Northern SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

PronounEdit

sin

  1. accusative and genitive of sii

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sinn.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

DeterminerEdit

sin m (feminine si, neuter sitt, plural sine)

  1. (reflexive) her / his / its / their
  2. indicating possession; 's, of
    Det var skolen sin bil.
    It was the school's car.

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sinn.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

sin m (feminine si, neuter sitt, plural sine)

  1. (reflexive) her/his/its/their
  2. indicating possession; 's, of
    Det var skulen sin bil.
    It was the the school's car.

ReferencesEdit


Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *sīnaz.

DeterminerEdit

sīn m, n, f

  1. his, its, hers

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *sīnaz (his, her, its, their, genitive reflexive), from Proto-Indo-European *seynos (his), genitive of *só (that). Cognate with Old Frisian sīn (his, its), Old Saxon sīn (his) (Middle Low German sin), Dutch zijn, Old High German sīn (his) (German sein), Old Norse sínn (one's own), Old English (that, that one, he). More at the.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

sīn

  1. (rare, chiefly dialectal, reflexive possessive pronoun) His; her; its; their.
    him Hrōþgār ġewāt tō hofe sīnum — For him Hrothgar went to his courtyard
    þæt wīf tredeð mid sīnum fōtom — The woman walked with her feet
    þec Israhēla heriað, herran sīnne — Israel plunders thee, their lords

Usage notesEdit

  • Usually occurs in non-West Saxon dialects; rarely occurs in West Saxon prose, where it was replaced early on by the genitive forms: his, hiere and heora.

DeclensionEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *sindos (compare Welsh hyn), from Proto-Indo-European *sḗm (one) or *só (that); strong doublet of in (the).

DeterminerEdit

sin

  1. that (used after the noun, which is preceded by the definite article)
    a ndéde sin – "that pair (of things)"

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

PronounEdit

sin

  1. that (as a direct object, used together with a clitic pronoun)
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 14d26
      Is i persin Crist da·gníu-sa sin.
      It is in the person of Christ that I do that.

Old NorseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *senawō.

NounEdit

sin f (genitive sinar)

  1. cord, tendon, sinew; nerve

ReferencesEdit

  • sin in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old SaxonEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *sīnaz.

DeterminerEdit

sīn m, n

  1. (dialectal, reflexive possessive pronoun) his, its
    • that thar sīn ist: that sculun iuuua seolon uuesen
      Those are his lies: that they shall be your souls
      (Heliand, verse 3832)
DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁es- (to be, exist) (with some parts from Proto-Germanic *wesaną (to be)). Cognate with Old Dutch sīn (to be), Old English sēon (to be), Old High German sīn. More at sooth.

VerbEdit

sīn (irregular)

  1. to be (more at wesan)
ConjugationEdit
DescendantsEdit

PicardEdit

PronounEdit

sin m

  1. his, hers or its

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish sin.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

sin

  1. that
    Dè tha sin? - What is that?

Derived termsEdit

DeterminerEdit

sin

  1. (used with the definite article) that
    an gille sin — that boy

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *synъ, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sȋn m (Cyrillic spelling си̑н)

  1. son
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sȉn m (Cyrillic spelling си̏н)

  1. sin (letter of various Semitic abjads)
DeclensionEdit

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *synъ, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

NounEdit

sín m anim (genitive sína or sinú, nominative plural síni or sinôvi)

  1. son

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sine. Cognate with English sans, French sans, Italian senza, and Portuguese sem.


PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

sin

  1. without

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Nominalisation of sina (run dry).

NounEdit

sin ?

  1. Dryness, the state of having run dry.
Usage notesEdit

Most commonly used when referring to either milk or funds.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Swedish sīn, from Old Norse sínn, from Proto-Germanic *sīnaz. Cognate with Danish sin, Gothic 𐍃𐌴𐌹𐌽𐍃 (seins), German sein, Dutch zijn.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

sin c (neuter sitt, plural sina)

  1. his (own), her (own), its (own), their (own). (Reflexive possessive third person pronoun).
    Han hämtade sin post för tio minuter sedan
    He picked up his (own) mail ten minutes ago
    Compare: Han hämtade hans post för tio minuter sedan
    He picked up his (somebody else’s) mail ten minutes ago.
    Hon samlar sina dikter i en låda
    She collects her poems in a box
    Hunden tycker inte om sitt halsband
    The dog doesn’t like its collar
    De tog sina papper och lämnade mötet
    They gathered their papers and left the meeting
Usage notesEdit
  • The inflection of the word sin is determined by the gender and number of the object: sin for common singular, sitt for neuter singular, and sina for plural, just like an adjective.
DeclensionEdit

TatarEdit

PronounEdit

sin

  1. you (singular), thou

TurkishEdit

NounEdit

sin (definite accusative sini, plural sinler)

  1. grave, burial place

InflectionEdit

Inflection
Nominative sin
Definite accusative sini
Singular Plural
Nominative sin sinler
Definite accusative sini sinleri
Dative sine sinlere
Locative sinde sinlerde
Ablative sinden sinlerden
Genitive sinin sinlerin

VietnameseEdit

West FrisianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sin c

  1. sentence (syntactic unit containing a subject and a predicate)
  2. sense (means of experiencing the external world)
  3. meaning, sense, significance

NounEdit

sin n

  1. mood
  2. opinion, view