Old Irish

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From com- +‎ Proto-Celtic *oweti, the latter being inherited from Proto-Indo-European *h₁éwH-e-ti (to help). It is a close cognate of Sanskrit अवति (ávati, to help).[1]

The verbal noun comét and the deponent preterite forms are suppleted from a form of Proto-Celtic *emeti also prefixed with com-. Compare do·eim of similar meaning.[2]

Pronunciation

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Verb

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con·ói (prototonic ·comai, verbal noun comét)

  1. to protect, guard
  2. to preserve, keep
    • c. 815-840, “The Monastery of Tallaght”, in Edward J. Gwynn, Walter J. Purton, transl., Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, volume 29, Royal Irish Academy, published 1911-1912, paragraph 6, pages 115-179:
      ...céne con·n-oither mo thimnasa insin purt-sa. Nícon·ibthar lind dermait dé and.
      ...as long as my rules are upheld in this place, alcoholic beverages that lead to us forgetting about God are not to be drunk.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 29d29
      is Día cota·óei-ade tre a gnímo-som
      It is God who preserves [the heavenly reward] through his deeds.

Conjugation

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Derived terms

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References

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  1. ^ Rix, Helmut, editor (2001), “*h₁eu̯H-”, in Lexikon der indogermanischen Verben [Lexicon of Indo-European Verbs] (in German), 2nd edition, Wiesbaden: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, →ISBN, page 243f.
  2. ^ Thurneysen, Rudolf (1940, reprinted 2017) D. A. Binchy and Osborn Bergin, transl., A Grammar of Old Irish, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, →ISBN, § 729, page 451

Further reading

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