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See also: comma, čoma, čomā, and cơ mà

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek κῶμα (kôma, deep sleep).

NounEdit

coma (plural comas)

  1. A state of unconsciousness from which one may not wake up, usually induced by some form of trauma.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin coma (hair of the head), from Ancient Greek κόμη (kómē, hair).

NounEdit

coma (plural comae)

  1. (astronomy) A cloud of dust surrounding the nucleus of a comet.
  2. (optics) A defect characterized by diffuse, pear-shaped images that should be points.
  3. (botany) A tuft or bunch, such as the assemblage of branches forming the head of a tree, a cluster of bracts when empty and terminating the inflorescence of a plant, or a tuft of long hairs on certain seeds.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek κῶμα (kôma, deep sleep).

NounEdit

coma m (plural comes)

  1. coma (deep sleep)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin comma, from Ancient Greek κόμμα (kómma).

NounEdit

coma f (plural comes)

  1. comma (punctuation mark)
Derived termsEdit

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: co‧ma

NounEdit

coma n (plural coma's)

  1. coma (state of unconsciousness)

NounEdit

coma f (plural coma's, diminutive comaatje n)

  1. coma (head of a comet)

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

coma m (plural comas)

  1. coma (state of unconsciousness)
    • 1825, Etienne-Marin Bailly, Traité anatomico-pathologique des fièvres intermittentes simples et pernicieuses
      Le coma suivi de symptômes convulsifs, est moins dangereux que lorsqu'il leur succède, à moins que dans ce dernier cas il soit nerveux, et que le malade se réveille facilement, on exécute, sinon des mouvements volontaires, au moins des mouvements automatiques.
      (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

coma (uncountable)

  1. coma

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek κῶμα (kôma, deep sleep).

NounEdit

coma m (invariable)

  1. coma (sleep)

AnagramsEdit


LadinEdit

NounEdit

coma f (plural comes)

  1. (Val di Fassa, law) subsection
  2. (Val di Fassa, orthography) comma

SynonymsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek κόμη (kómē, hair of the head), which is of uncertain origin and sometimes linked to κόμέω (to care for (in the sense of hair)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coma f (genitive comae); first declension

  1. The hair of the head.
  2. foliage

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative coma comae
Genitive comae comārum
Dative comae comīs
Accusative comam comās
Ablative comā comīs
Vocative coma comae

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • coma in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • coma in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • coma in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • coma in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • coma in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkomɐ/
  • Hyphenation: co‧ma

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek κῶμα (kôma, deep sleep).

NounEdit

coma m (plural comas)

  1. coma, state of unconsciousness

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin coma.

NounEdit

coma f (plural comas)

  1. abundant hair of the head
  2. mane
  3. (astronomy) comet coma
SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

coma

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of comer
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of comer
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of comer
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of comer

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cummae, from Proto-Indo-European *kom-smiyo-, from *kom (beside, with, by) + *sem- (one, as one).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

coma

  1. indifferent, unconcerned
    • Tha e coma.
      He couldn't care less.
    • 'S mi a tha coma dè thachras.
      I don't give a damn what happens.
    • Coma de sin!
      Never mind that! Forget that!
  2. reckless, careless
  3. or expressing dislike or even hate when used with le
    • Is coma leam thu
      I hate you.
    • Is coma leis an rìgh Eòghann agus is coma le Eòghann co-dhiù
      The king doesn't like Eòghann, but Eòghann doesn't care whether the king likes him or not.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • cummae” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin comma.

NounEdit

coma f (plural comas)

  1. comma
  2. (church) misericord
  3. (music) section
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek κῶμα (kôma, deep sleep).

NounEdit

coma m (plural comas)

  1. coma

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Latin coma[1].

NounEdit

coma f (plural comas)

  1. (rare) mane
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

VerbEdit

coma

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of comer.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of comer.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of comer.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of comer.

ReferencesEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English comma.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coma m (plural comas)

  1. comma

SynonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
coma goma nghoma choma
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.