controversia

See also: controvérsia

Contents

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin contrōversia

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kon.tro.ˈvɛr.sja/
  • Rhymes: -ɛrsja
  • Hyphenation: con‧tro‧vèr‧sia

NounEdit

controversia f ‎(plural controversie)

  1. controversy
  2. dispute (legal)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

contrōversia f ‎(genitive contrōversiae); first declension

  1. a quarrel, dispute, debate
  2. (law) lawsuit
  3. contradiction

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative contrōversia contrōversiae
genitive contrōversiae contrōversiārum
dative contrōversiae contrōversiīs
accusative contrōversiam contrōversiās
ablative contrōversiā contrōversiīs
vocative contrōversia contrōversiae

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • controversia” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • controversia” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be at variance with: in controversia (contentione) esse, versari
    • to be at variance with: in controversiam cadere
    • to make a thing the subject of controversy: in controversiam vocare, adducere aliquid
    • to be contested, become the subject of debate: in controversiam vocari, adduci, venire (De Or. 2. 72. 291)
    • to leave a point undecided: in controversia relinquere aliquid
    • to maintain a controversy with some one: controversiam (contentionem) habere cum aliquo
    • the point at issue: id, de quo agitur or id quod cadit in controversiam
    • to put an end to, settle a dispute: controversiam sedare, dirimere, componere, tollere
    • to decide a debated question: controversiam diiudicare
    • indisputably; incontestably: sine (ulla) controversia

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

controversia f ‎(plural controversias)

  1. controversy

Related termsEdit

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