dispute

See also: Dispute and disputé

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English disputen, from Old French desputer (French disputer), from Latin disputāre (to dispute, discuss, examine, compute, estimate), from dis- (apart) + putāre (to reckon, consider, think, originally make clean, clear up), related to purus (pure). Compare compute, count, impute, repute, amputate, etc.

PronunciationEdit

  • (noun)
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdɪs.pjuːt/
    • (US) IPA(key): /dɪsˈpjuːt/
    • (file)
  • (verb)
  • Rhymes: -uːt

NounEdit

dispute (plural disputes)

  1. An argument or disagreement, a failure to agree.
  2. (uncountable) Verbal controversy or disagreement; altercation; debate.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

dispute (third-person singular simple present disputes, present participle disputing, simple past and past participle disputed)

  1. (intransitive) to contend in argument; to argue against something maintained, upheld, or claimed, by another.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      "Now, though thy thoughts are green and tender, as becometh one so young, yet are they those of a thinking brain, and in truth thou dost bring back to my mind certain of those old philosophers with whom in days bygone I have disputed at Athens, and at Becca in Arabia, for thou hast the same crabbed air and dusty look, as though thou hadst passed thy days in reading ill-writ Greek, and been stained dark with the grime of manuscripts."
  2. (transitive) to make a subject of disputation; to argue pro and con; to discuss
    Some residents disputed the proposal, saying it was based more on emotion than fact.
  3. to oppose by argument or assertion; to controvert; to express dissent or opposition to; to call in question; to deny the truth or validity of
    to dispute assertions or arguments
    • 1834-1874, George Bancroft, History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent.
      to seize goods under the disputed authority of writs of assistance
  4. to strive or contend about; to contest
    • 1856-1858, William H. Prescott, History of the Reign of Philip II
      to dispute the possession of the ground with the Spaniards
  5. (obsolete) to struggle against; to resist

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin disputāre.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dispute f (plural disputes)

  1. dispute

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Romanian: dispută

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

dispute f

  1. plural of disputa

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

dispute

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of disputar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of disputar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of disputar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of disputar

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dispute f

  1. indefinite plural of dispută
  2. indefinite genitive/dative singular of dispută

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /disˈpute/, [d̪isˈpu.t̪e]

VerbEdit

dispute

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of disputar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of disputar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of disputar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of disputar.