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See also: coryphee

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French coryphée, from Latin coryphaeus, from Ancient Greek κορυφαῖος (koruphaîos, leader), from κορυφή (koruphḗ, head).

NounEdit

coryphée (plural coryphées)

  1. A ballet dancer ranking above a member of the corps de ballet and below a soloist.
    • 1982, TC Boyle, Water Music, Penguin 2006, p. 305:
      The sick throw away their crutches and dance like coryphées, the enfeebled strain to lift logs and boulders […].
    • 1866, The Round Table - Volume 4, page 40:
      Go into the wealthiest and gayest quarters of the town and you shall see maidens of fifteen tripping along in scores with their young cheeks bechalked and bedizened in a manner that almost puts to the shame a coryphée of the grand opera.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin coryphaeus, itself a borrowing from Ancient Greek κορυφαῖος (koruphaîos, leader), from κορυφή (koruphḗ, head).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coryphée m (plural coryphées)

  1. (Ancient Greece) leader of the ancient Greek chorus, coryphaeus

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit