See also: Drama, dramă, dràma, and dráma

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin drāma, from Ancient Greek δρᾶμα (drâma, an act, a theatrical act, a play), from δράω (dráō, to act, to take action, to achieve).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drama (usually uncountable, plural dramas or dramata)

  1. A composition, normally in prose, telling a story and intended to be represented by actors impersonating the characters and speaking the dialogue
    The author released her latest drama, which became a best-seller.
  2. Such a work for television, radio or the cinema (usually one that is not a comedy)
  3. Theatrical plays in general
  4. A situation in real life that has the characteristics of such a theatrical play
    After losing my job, having a car crash, and the big row with my neighbours, I don't need any more drama.
    • 2018 July 8, Euan McKirdy & Hilary Whiteman, “Thai cave rescue: Divers enter cave to free boys”, in edition.cnn.com[1], CNN, retrieved 2018-07-08:
      Thais have been gripped by the two-week drama unfolding at the Tham Luang cave system, and took to social media Sunday as rescue efforts unfolded.
  5. (slang) Rumor, lying or exaggerated reaction to life or online events; melodrama; an angry dispute or scene; a situation made more complicated or worse than it should be; intrigue or spiteful interpersonal maneuvering.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Arabic: دْرَامَا(drāmā)
  • Cebuano: drama
  • Japanese: ドラマ (dorama)
  • Korean: 드라마 (deurama)
  • Malay: drama

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek δρᾶμα (drâma, an act, a theatrical act, a play), from δράω (dráō, to act, to take action, to achieve).

NounEdit

drama m (plural drames)

  1. drama (theatrical and media genre)
  2. drama (theatrical plays in general)
  3. drama (difficult situation)
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Ancient Greek δραχμή (drakhmḗ, a drachma).

NounEdit

drama f (plural drames)

  1. Obsolete spelling of dracma

CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English drama, from Ancient Greek δρᾶμα (drâma, an act, a theatrical act, a play), from δράω (dráō, to act, to take action, to achieve).

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: dra‧ma

NounEdit

drama

  1. a theatrical play; a skit
  2. a radio drama
  3. a soap opera, a TV show that is not a comedy.
  4. an act; a display of behavior meant to deceive
  5. (derogatory) a show; mere display or pomp with no substance

VerbEdit

drama

  1. to be emotional or sentimental
  2. to put on an act

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:drama.


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin drama.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈdrama]
  • Hyphenation: dra‧ma

NounEdit

drama n

  1. drama (composition intended for actors)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • drama in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • drama in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin drāma, from Ancient Greek δρᾶμα (drâma).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drama n (plural drama's, diminutive dramaatje n)

  1. drama (theatrical work; anything involving play acting).
  2. Something tragic, a tragedy.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drama n (genitive singular drama, no plural)

  1. drama

DeclensionEdit


IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch drama, from Late Latin drāma, from Ancient Greek δρᾶμα (drâma).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈdrama]
  • Hyphenation: dra‧ma

NounEdit

drama (first-person possessive dramaku, second-person possessive dramamu, third-person possessive dramanya)

  1. drama:
    1. a composition, normally in prose, telling a story and intended to be represented by actors impersonating the characters and speaking the dialogue.
    2. theatrical plays in general.
      Synonyms: sandiwara, teater, tonil
  2. (colloquial) tragedy, a disastrous event, especially one involving great loss of life or injury.
    Synonym: tragedi

Affixed termsEdit

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drama m (genitive singular drama, nominative plural dramaí)

  1. Cois Fharraige form of dráma

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
drama dhrama ndrama
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek δρᾶμα (drâma, an act, a theatrical act, a play).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drāma n (genitive drāmatis); third declension

  1. drama, play

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative drāma drāmata
Genitive drāmatis drāmatum
Dative drāmatī drāmatibus
Accusative drāma drāmata
Ablative drāmate drāmatibus
Vocative drāma drāmata

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • drama in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • drama in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • drama in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • drama in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • drama in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

MalteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately Latin drama. Doublet of dramm.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drama f

  1. dramatic art

Related termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek δρᾶμα (drâma, an act, a theatrical act, a play).

NounEdit

drama n (definite singular dramaet, indefinite plural drama or dramaer, definite plural dramaene)

  1. a drama

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek δρᾶμα (drâma).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drama n (definite singular dramaet, indefinite plural drama, definite plural dramaa)

  1. (countable or uncountable) a drama

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /ˈdɾɐ̃.mɐ/, [ˈdɾɐ̃.mɐ]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈdɾɐ.mɐ/, [ˈdɾɐ.mɐ]

NounEdit

drama m (plural dramas)

  1. drama (composition)
  2. drama (theatrical play)
  3. drama (dramatic situation)

Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drama m (genitive singular drama, plural dramaichean)

  1. Alternative form of dràm

NounEdit

drama

  1. genitive singular of dràm

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /drâma/
  • Hyphenation: dra‧ma

NounEdit

drȁma f (Cyrillic spelling дра̏ма)

  1. drama

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin drama, from Ancient Greek δρᾶμα (drâma). Cognate with English drama.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɾama/, [ˈd̪ɾa.ma]

NounEdit

drama m (plural dramas)

  1. drama (genre in art, film, theatre and literature or a work of said genre)
  2. drama, tragedy, plight (quality of intense or high emotion or situation of enormous gravity that heightens such emotions)
    Synonym: tragedia
  3. drama (theatre studies)
    Synonym: teatro
  4. play (work of theatre)
    Synonym: obra
  5. big deal, fuss, scene
    Synonyms: gran cosa, escándalo, escena

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drama n

  1. a drama

DeclensionEdit

Declension of drama 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative drama dramat dramer dramerna
Genitive dramas dramats dramers dramernas

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


VepsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Russian дра́ма (dráma).

NounEdit

drama

  1. drama (theatre)

InflectionEdit

Inflection of drama
nominative sing. drama
genitive sing. draman
partitive sing. dramad
partitive plur. dramoid
singular plural
nominative drama dramad
accusative draman dramad
genitive draman dramoiden
partitive dramad dramoid
essive-instructive draman dramoin
translative dramaks dramoikš
inessive dramas dramoiš
elative dramaspäi dramoišpäi
illative ? dramoihe
adessive dramal dramoil
ablative dramalpäi dramoilpäi
allative dramale dramoile
abessive dramata dramoita
comitative dramanke dramoidenke
prolative dramadme dramoidme
approximative I dramanno dramoidenno
approximative II dramannoks dramoidennoks
egressive dramannopäi dramoidennopäi
terminative I ? dramoihesai
terminative II dramalesai dramoilesai
terminative III dramassai
additive I ? dramoihepäi
additive II dramalepäi dramoilepäi

ReferencesEdit

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007), “драма”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin drāma, from Ancient Greek δρᾶμα (drâma, an act, a theatrical act, a play), from δράω (dráō, to act, to take action, to achieve).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drama f (plural dramâu)

  1. drama, play

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
drama ddrama nrama unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.