couillon

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French couillon, from Old French coillon, from Vulgar Latin *cōleōnem, accusative singular of *cōleō, from Latin cōleus; equivalent to couille +‎ -on. Compare Catalan colló, Spanish cojón, Portuguese colhão, Italian coglione.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

couillon m (plural couillons, feminine couillonne)

  1. (vulgar) dickhead, bastard
    Il t'a vraiment trompée ? J'étais sûr que c'était un couillon, ce type.
    He really cheated on you? I knew that guy was a bastard.
  2. (vulgar) coward
    C'est un vrai couillon, il est pas capable d'aborder une fille.
    He's a real coward, he's not capable of approaching a girl.
  3. (card games) A Belgian card game that is also played in Limburg and on the border of Luxemburg and Germany.
  4. (Louisiana) joker, funny person; nut, nutter
  5. (Louisiana) fool, simpleton, nitwit

DescendantsEdit

  • Alemannic German: Gajung

AdjectiveEdit

couillon (feminine singular couillonne, masculine plural couillons, feminine plural couillonnes)

  1. (vulgar) fucking stupid
  2. (Louisiana) foolish

Usage notesEdit

  • As both an adjective and a noun, couillon is not as vulgar or strong in Louisiana French or even in France.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French coillon, from Vulgar Latin *cōleōnem, accusative singular of *cōleō, from Latin cōleus; equivalent to couille +‎ -on.

NounEdit

couillon m (plural couillons)

  1. (vulgar) dickhead, bastard
    • 1552, François Rabelais, Le Tiers Livre:
      Il est (dist lors frere Ian) sourd. Il n'entend ce que tu luy diz couillon.
      He is (said their brother Jan) deaf. He can't hear what you say, dickhead.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit