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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English fole (fool), from Old French fol (cf. modern French fou (mad)) from Latin follis.[1]. Doublet of follis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fool (plural fools)

  1. (pejorative) A person with poor judgment or little intelligence.
    You were a fool to cross that busy road without looking.
    The village fool threw his own shoes down the well.
    • Franklin
      Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other.
  2. (historical) A jester; a person whose role was to entertain a sovereign and the court (or lower personages).
  3. (informal) Someone who derives pleasure from something specified.
    • Milton
      Can they think me [] their fool or jester?
    • 1975, Foghat, "Fool for the City" (song), Fool for the City (album):
      I'm a fool for the city.
  4. (slang) Buddy, dude, person.
  5. (cooking) A type of dessert made of puréed fruit and custard or cream.
    an apricot fool; a gooseberry fool
  6. (often capitalized, Fool) A particular card in a tarot deck.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

fool (third-person singular simple present fools, present participle fooling, simple past and past participle fooled)

  1. To trick; to make a fool of someone.
  2. To play the fool; to trifle; to toy; to spend time in idle sport or mirth.
    • Dryden
      Is this a time for fooling?
    • 1972, Judy Blume, Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing (page 56)
      She's always complaining that she got stuck with the worst possible committee. And that me and Jimmy fool more than we work.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ fool in: T. F. Hoad, Concise Dictionary of English Etymology, Oxford University Press, 2003, →ISBN

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French fol (French fou (mad)) from Latin follis.[1]

NounEdit

fool (plural fools)

  1. fool

RohingyaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit पागल (pāgala)

NounEdit

fool

  1. mad man
    1. ^ fool in: T. F. Hoad, Concise Dictionary of English Etymology, Oxford University Press, 2003, →ISBN