Last modified on 7 February 2015, at 18:18

cower

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German kuren or from Scandinavian (Icelandic kúra (to doze)). Cognate to German kauern (to squat), Dutch koeren (to keep watch (in a cowered position)). Unrelated to coward, which is of Latin origin.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cower (third-person singular simple present cowers, present participle cowering, simple past and past participle cowered)

  1. (intransitive) To crouch or cringe, or to avoid or shy away from something, in fear.
    He'd be useless in war. He'd just cower in his bunker until the enemy came in and shot him, or until the war was over.
    • Dryden
      Our dame sits cowering o'er a kitchen fire.
    • Goldsmith
      Like falcons, cowering on the nest.
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

cower (third-person singular simple present cowers, present participle cowering, simple past and past participle cowered)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To cherish with care.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.