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See also: décadent

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French décadent, back-formation from décadence, from Medieval Latin decadentia, from Late Latin decadens, present participle of decadō (sink, fall). Cognate with French décadent.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

decadent (comparative more decadent, superlative most decadent)

  1. Characterized by moral or cultural decline.
    • Gore Vidal - The Decline and Fall of the American Empire (1992)
      As societies grow decadent, the language grows decadent, too. Words are used to disguise, not to illuminate, action: you liberate a city by destroying it. Words are to confuse, so that at election time people will solemnly vote against their own interests.
  2. Luxuriously self-indulgent.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

decadent (plural decadents)

  1. A person affected by moral decay.
    • L. Douglas
      He had the fastidiousness, the preciosity, the love of archaisms, of your true decadent.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin decadens.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

decadent (masculine and feminine plural decadents)

  1. decadent

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit