deteriorate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin dēteriorātus, past participle of Late Latin dēteriorō, derivative of Latin dēterior (worse)

PronunciationEdit

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dɪˈtɪəɹɪəɹeɪt/, (proscribed) /dɪˈtɪəɹɪ.eɪt/
  • (file)
  • (General American) IPA(key): /dəˈtɪ.ɹi.ə.ɹeɪt/, (proscribed) /dəˈtɪ.ɹi.eɪt/

VerbEdit

deteriorate (third-person singular simple present deteriorates, present participle deteriorating, simple past and past participle deteriorated)

  1. (transitive) To make worse; to make inferior in quality or value; to impair.
    to deteriorate the mind
    • 1829, Robert Southey, Sir Thomas More; or, Colloquies on the Progress and Prospects of Society
      The art of war, like every other art, ecclesiastical architecture alone excepted, was greatly deteriorated during those years of general degradation []
  2. (intransitive) To grow worse; to be impaired in quality; to degenerate.
    • 2011 January 8, Paul Fletcher, “Stevenage 3 - 1 Newcastle”, in BBC[1]:
      It was turning into an abysmal afternoon for Newcastle and it deteriorated further when Tiote saw red for his challenge on Jon Ashton.

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ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

deteriorate

  1. feminine plural of deteriorato

VerbEdit

deteriorate

  1. inflection of deteriorare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of deteriorato