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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sinful, synful, senful, sunful, from Old English synful (sinful, guilty, wicked, corrupt), equivalent to sin +‎ -ful. Cognate with Dutch zondevol (sinful), German sündevoll (sinful), Danish syndefuld (sinful), Swedish syndfull (sinful), Icelandic syndfullur (sinful).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɪnfəl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

sinful (comparative more sinful, superlative most sinful)

  1. constituting a sin; being morally or religiously wrong; wicked; evil
    Antonym: sinless
  2. (colloquial) decadent (luxuriously self-indulgent)
    • 2018 April 10, Cohn, Rachel; Levithan, David, Sam & Ilsa's Last Hurrah[1], New York City: Random House, →ISBN:
      I take a whiff of the most sincerely sinful cookies in the history of the world. It’s a recipe I saw in People magazine once at the dentist's office, and Dr. Segal would not approve of its ingredients (or maybe she would, in the interest of keeping her business afloat).

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit