desirable

See also: désirable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French desirable.

Morphologically desire +‎ -able.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈzaɪəɹəbəl/, [dɪˈzaɪ(j)əɹəbəɫ]
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

desirable (comparative more desirable, superlative most desirable)

  1. Worthy to be desired; pleasing; agreeable.
    This applicant has almost all desirable properties.
    • 1992, Rudolf M[athias] Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page vii:
      With fresh material, taxonomic conclusions are leavened by recognition that the material examined reflects the site it occupied; a herbarium packet gives one only a small fraction of the data desirable for sound conclusions. Herbarium material does not, indeed, allow one to extrapolate safely: what you see is what you get []

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

desirable (plural desirables)

  1. A thing that people want; something that is desirable.
    There are plenty of desirables on display in the window.

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

desirable m or f (plural desirables)

  1. desirable