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dingolay

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from Kongo [Term?] (twist, gyrate).

VerbEdit

dingolay (third-person singular simple present dingolays, present participle dingolaying, simple past and past participle dingolayed)

  1. (Caribbean, intransitive) To perform a kind of lively dance with hand movements.
    • 1945, Many a green isle, page 268:
      Hands clapped, feet tapped, bodies dingolayed.
    • 1975, D. W. Rogers, Lalaja, a tale of retributio, page 164:
      "Madam, we have a way to say when somebody can walk well, we say they dingolay well." Pamela laughed. "You mean that Don . . . can dingolay well," Lalaja laughed.
    • 1994, Learie Alleyne-Forte, Jokers on the Abyss' Edge: A Collection of Short Stories, page 19:
      All he did was duck, and there he was, in Brazil, serenading in the moonlight, and round the campfire some women dancing samba and the music hot like fire. And everybody dingolaying. And same time somebody calling him, "Come, come. Trinidad on fire."
    • 2010, Annette Osborne, ...As a Tale That Is Told, page 139:
      The crowd was wild as she “dingolayed” to get the attention of the male lead singer.
    • 2013 February 6, Kevon Felmine, “Odel retains King of the Rock title”, in Trinidad & Tobago Guardian[1]:
      Lichorich put on a performance that antagonised the crowd, who shouted profanities as he constantly dingolayed around the ring in a bid to avoid confrontation with Ralph.

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