See also: Lively

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lyvely, lifly, from Old English līflīċ (living, lively, long-lived, necessary to life, vital), equivalent to life +‎ -ly. Cognate with Scots lively, lifely (of or pertaining to life, vital, living, life-like). Doublet of lifely.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lively (comparative livelier, superlative liveliest)

  1. Full of life; energetic.
  2. Bright, glowing, vivid; strong, vigorous.
    • 1704, Isaac Newton, Opticks: Or, A Treatise of the Reflections, Refractions, Inflections and Colours of Light
      The colours of the prism are manifestly more full, intense, and lively that those of natural bodies.
    • 1688, Robert South, Sacramental Preparation: Set forth in a Sermon on Matthew 5, 12.
      His faith must be not only living, but lively too.
  3. (archaic) Endowed with or manifesting life; living.
    • c. 1600, Philemon Holland
      chaplets of gold and silver resembling lively flowers and leaves
  4. (archaic) Representing life; lifelike.
  5. (archaic) Airy; animated; spirited.
  6. (of beer) Fizzy; foamy; tending to produce a large head in the glass.
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NounEdit

lively (plural livelies)

  1. (nautical, informal) Term of address.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English lyvely, lifly, from Old English līflīċe, equivalent to life +‎ -ly.

AdverbEdit

lively (comparative more lively, superlative most lively)

  1. Vigorously.
  2. Vibrantly, vividly.
  3. (obsolete) In a lifelike manner.
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