See also: Kind and -kind

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: kīnd, IPA(key): /kaɪnd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English kynde, kunde, cunde, icunde, from Old English cynd (generation, kind, nature, race), ġecynd, from Proto-Germanic *kundiz, *gakundiz, related to *kunją. Cognate with Icelandic kind (race, species, kind). See also kin.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

kind (plural kinds)

  1. A type, race or category; a group of entities that have common characteristics such that they may be grouped together.
    What kind of a person are you?
    This is a strange kind of tobacco.
  2. A makeshift or otherwise atypical specimen.
    The opening served as a kind of window.
    • 1884, Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapter VIII
      I got my traps out of the canoe and made me a nice camp in the thick woods. I made a kind of a tent out of my blankets to put my things under so the rain couldn't get at them.
  3. (archaic) One's inherent nature; character, natural disposition.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter vij, in Le Morte Darthur, book III:
      And whan he cam ageyne he sayd / O my whyte herte / me repenteth that thow art dede / [] / and thy deth shalle be dere bought and I lyue / and anone he wente in to his chamber and armed hym / and came oute fyersly / & there mette he with syr gauayne / why haue ye slayne my houndes said syr gauayn / for they dyd but their kynde
  4. (archaic) Family, lineage.
  5. (archaic) Manner.
  6. Goods or services used as payment, as e.g. in barter.
    • 1691, John Dryden, Prologue to King Arthur
      Some of you, on pure instinct of nature, / Are led by kind t'admire your fellow-creature.
  7. Equivalent means used as response to an action.
    I'll pay in kind for his insult.
  8. (Christianity) Each of the two elements of the communion service, bread and wine.
Usage notesEdit

In sense “goods or services” or “equivalent means”, used almost exclusively with “in” in expression in kind.

SynonymsEdit
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(1) and/or (2)

Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English kinde, kunde, kende, from Old English cynde, ġecynde (innate, natural, native), from Old English cynd, ġecynd (nature, kind).

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

kind (comparative kinder, superlative kindest)

  1. Having a benevolent, courteous, friendly, generous, gentle, liberal, sympathetic, or warm-hearted nature or disposition, marked by consideration for – and service to – others.
  2. Affectionate.
    a kind man; a kind heart
  3. Favorable.
  4. Mild, gentle, forgiving
    The years have been kind to Richard Gere; he ages well.
  5. Gentle; tractable; easily governed.
    a horse kind in harness
  6. (obsolete) Characteristic of the species; belonging to one's nature; natural; native.
    • c. 1385, William Langland, Piers Plowman, I:
      Ȝet haue I no kynde knowing quod I · ȝet mote ȝe kenne me better.
    • 1601, Philemon Holland, The Historie of the World, commonly called the Naturall Historie (originally by Pliny the Elder)
      it becommeth sweeter than it should be, and loseth the kind tast.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
terms derived from kind (adjective)
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch kind, from Middle Dutch kint, from Old Dutch kint, from Proto-Germanic *kindą (offspring), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁tóm.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kind (plural kinders)

  1. child

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse kinn, from Proto-Germanic *kinnuz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénu- (cheek). Compare Swedish kind, Norwegian and Icelandic kinn, Low German and German Kinn, Dutch kin, English chin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kind c (singular definite kinden, plural indefinite kinder)

  1. cheek

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch kint, from Old Dutch kint, from Proto-West Germanic *kind (offspring), from Proto-Germanic *kindą (offspring), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁tóm (that which is produced, that which is given birth to), related to *ǵn̥h₁tós (produced, given birth), from *ǵenh₁- (to produce, to give birth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kind n (plural kinderen or kinders, diminutive kindje n or kindertje n or kindeken n or kindelijn n)

  1. child, kid, non-adult human
    Lieve kinderen, wij missen jullie. (typical paedagogical window message during COVID-19 measures)
    Dear children, we miss you.
  2. descendant, still a minor or irrespective of age
    In sommige patriarchale tradities blijven kinderen levenslang onvoorwaardelijk onderworpen aan het vaderlijk gezag, zoals aanvankelijk in het Oude Rome, in andere houdt een zoon op kind te zijn door zijn eigen gezin te stichten
    In certain patriarchal traditions, children remain subject to unconditional paternal authority for life, as originally in Ancient Rome, in other ones a son ceases to be a child by founding his own family
    Synonyms: afstammeling, telg
  3. (figuratively) product of influence, breeding etc.

Usage notesEdit

  • The normal plural is kinderen. The form kinders is heard colloquially, often also humorously.
  • In compounds, the word can take the form kinder- or kind- as a tail. The former is used more often, however.
  • The dimunitive kindelijn is now archaic, but can still be found in some fossilized songs and religious texts.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: kind

IcelandicEdit

 
Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
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EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse kind, from Proto-Germanic *kinþiz, cognate with Latin gēns (clan, tribe). The sense of “sheep” is derived from the compound sauðkind, literally “sheep-kind”.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kind f

  1. (obsolete) race, kind, kin
  2. a sheep (especially a ewe)
  3. (dated) used as a term of disparagement for a girl (or woman)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse kind f, from Proto-Germanic *kinþiz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénh₁tis. Akin to English kind.

NounEdit

kind m (definite singular kinden, indefinite plural kindar, definite plural kindane)
kind n (definite singular kindet, indefinite plural kind, definite plural kinda)

  1. a child in a cradle

ReferencesEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *kinþiz. Compare Latin gēns (clan, tribe).

NounEdit

kind f (genitive kindar, plural kindir or kindr)

  1. race, kind, kin
  2. creature, being

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • kind in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *kind (child).

NounEdit

kind n

  1. child

DeclensionEdit



DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse kinn, from Proto-Germanic *kinnuz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénu- (cheek). Compare Danish kind, Norwegian and Icelandic kinn, German Kinn, Dutch kin, English chin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kind c

  1. (anatomy) cheek; a part of the face.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of kind 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative kind kinden kinder kinderna
Genitive kinds kindens kinders kindernas

ZealandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch kint

NounEdit

kind n (plural kinders)

  1. child