disjoin

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English disjoynen, from Old French desjoindre, from Latin disiungere (to separate), from dis-, di- (apart) + iungere (to join).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪsˈdʒɔɪn/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪn

VerbEdit

disjoin (third-person singular simple present disjoins, present participle disjoining, simple past and past participle disjoined)

  1. (transitive) To separate; to disunite.
    • 1644, John Milton, The Doctrine or Discipline of Divorce:
      That marriage, therefore, God himself disjoins.
    • 1708, Joseph Addison, The Present State of the War, and the Necessity of an Augmentation
      Never let us lay down our arms against France, till we have utterly disjoined her from the Spanish monarchy.
    • 1790, Thomas Pennant, Account Of London
      Windmill Street consisted of disjoined houses.
  2. (intransitive) To become separated.

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