EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English dis-, borrowed from Latin dis-, from Proto-Indo-European *dwís.

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. reversal or removal
    disassociate, disarray, disconnect, disafforest
  2. Used as an intensifier of words with negative valence.
    disembowel, disannul, disgruntled
  3. incorrect
    disadaptation, disalign
  4. to fail (to)
    disagree, disanalogy
  5. not
    discontinue, disaccordant, discoherent, disacknowledge
  6. against
    dissuade, disadvise, disrecommend

Usage notesEdit

When attached to a verbal root, prefixes often change the first vowel (whether initial or preceded by a consonant/consonant cluster) of that verb. These phonological changes took place in Latin and usually do not apply to words created (as in Modern Latin) from Latin components since Latin became a 'dead' language. Note: the combination of prefix and following vowel did not always yield the same change. (see examples below at con- + -a-) Also, these changes in vowels are not necessarily particular to being prefixed with dis- (i.e. other prefixes sometimes cause the same vowel change- see con-, ex-).

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NOTE: Words using the prefix dis- do not necessarily use the prefixes given here when translated. See individual words for more accurate translations.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • dis- at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • dis- in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek δυσ- (dus-).

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. dys- (bad)
    disfàsiadysphasia

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin dis-. Compare the inherited des-.

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. Indicates negation.
    dis- + ‎sort (luck) → ‎dissort (misfortune)
Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Latin dis-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɪs/
  • (file)

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. dis-

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin dis-, from Proto-Indo-European *dwís.

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. shows separation, dissemination, e.g. semi (sow) > dissemi (disseminate) ; ŝiri (tear) > disŝiri (tear to pieces).

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin dis-. Compare the inherited dé-.

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. dis-

Derived termsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

dis-

  1. Romanization of 𐌳𐌹𐍃-

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Esperanto dis-, from Latin dis-, from Proto-Indo-European *dwís.

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. shows separation or dissemination

Derived termsEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch dis-, from Latin dis-, from Proto-Indo-European *dwís.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [dɪs]
  • Hyphenation: dis

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. dis- (reversal, removal; apart)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. Alternative form of dios-

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dis- dhis- ndis-
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dis-, from Proto-Indo-European *dwís. See also s-.

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. dis-
    dis- + ‎fare (do) → ‎disfare (undo)
    dis- + ‎organizzare (organize) → ‎disorganizzare (disorganize)

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *dwis-, from Proto-Indo-European *dwís. Cognate with Ancient Greek δίς (dís), Sanskrit द्विस् (dvis).

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. asunder, apart, in two
    mittōdismiss, disband
    discēdōpart, separate
  2. reversal, removal
    dissimulōdisguise, conceal
  3. utterly, exceedingly
    differtusstuffed full

Usage notesEdit

  • Before b, d, g, l, m, n, r, sc, sp, st and v, the prefix becomes dī-.
  • Before f, the prefix becomes dif-.
  • Before a consonantal i, the prefix may become dī- or remain as dis-.
  • Before a vowel or h, the prefix becomes dir- in the two verbs diribeō and dirimō, which arose early enough to be subject to rhotacism, but from Classical Latin onwards, dis- is used (see, for example, dishiascō in Cato).

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Albanian: z-
  • Catalan: des-; dis-
  • English: dis-
  • Esperanto: dis-
  • French: dé-, dés-; dis-
  • Gothic: 𐌳𐌹𐍃- (dis-)
  • Italian: dis-, s-

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French des- and its source Latin dis-.

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. Forms words denoting reversal or removal; dis-, de-.
    Synonym: de-
  2. Intensifies words with a negative connotation; dis-, de-.
    Synonym: de-

Usage notesEdit

  • Sometimes used interchangeably with de-; see that entry for more.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil including São Paulo) /ˈd͡ʒis/, [ˈd͡ʒis]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /ˈd͡ʒiʃ/, [ˈd͡ʒiʃ]

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin dis-. Compare the inherited des-.

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. dis- (indicates separation)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from New Latin dys-, from Ancient Greek δυσ- (dus-, bad, hard).

Alternative formsEdit

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. (medicine) dys- (forms the names of conditions characterised by difficult or inadequate function)
  2. dys- (bad or wrong)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin dis-. Compare the inherited des-.

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. dis-

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

dis-

  1. intensifying prefix
    dis- + ‎taw (quiet, silent) → ‎distaw (silent, noiseless)
    dis- + ‎pwyll (consideration) → ‎disbwyll (discretion, prudence)
  2. negative prefix
    dis- + ‎cloff (lame) → ‎disgloff (sure footed, agile)
    Synonyms: af-, an-, di-

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dis- ddis- nis- unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.