English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /daɪ/
  • (file)

Etymology 1 edit

PIE word
*dwóh₁

Borrowed from Latin di-, from Ancient Greek δι- (di-, two).

Prefix edit

Greek number prefix
2 Previous: mono-
Next: tri-

di-

  1. Two, twice or double.
    Synonyms: duo-, bi-, bis-
    carbon dioxide
Translations edit
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Latin dis-.

Prefix edit

di-

  1. Alternative form of dis-, shortened before l, m, n, r, s (followed by a consonant), and v; also often shortened before g, and sometimes before j.

Etymology 3 edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek δῐ- (di-), from Ancient Greek δῐά (diá, through).

Prefix edit

di-

  1. Alternative form of dia-, before a vowel.
    diactinic, dielectric

Derived terms edit

See also edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek δίς (dís, twice).

Prefix edit

di-

  1. di-

Derived terms edit

Danish edit

Prefix edit

di-

  1. two

Derived terms edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Ancient Greek δίς (dís, twice).

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

di-

  1. Meaning two, twice, or double.
    dioxide
    dioxide
    dipool
    diople

Esperanto edit

Etymology edit

Derived from Latin di-.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [di]
  • Hyphenation: di

Prefix edit

di-

  1. di-

Derived terms edit

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

Internationalism (see English di-), ultimately from Ancient Greek δι- (di-).

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

di-

  1. di- (double, twin)
    Synonyms: bi-, kaksois-

Derived terms edit

French edit

Prefix edit

di-

  1. di-

Derived terms edit

German edit

Etymology edit

Ultimately from Ancient Greek δίς (dís, twice).

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

di-

  1. di-

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • di-” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Indonesian edit

Etymology edit

From Malay di-, from Classical Malay di-, from Late Old Malay di-, from Early Old Malay ni-, from Early Proto-Malayic *ni-, a metathesis of Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *-in-, from Proto-Austronesian *-in- (verb perfective infix for object focus).

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

di-

  1. (transitive) Patient focus, used in an OVA sentence.
    dimakanto be eaten

Derived terms edit

Italian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /di/
  • Hyphenation: di-

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin de- (indicating removal or descent).

Prefix edit

di-

  1. de-
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Ancient Greek δίς (dís, twice).

Prefix edit

di-

  1. di-
Derived terms edit

Latin edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

dī-

  1. Alternative form of dis-
Usage notes edit

Occurs before b, d, g, l, m, n, r, sc, sp, st, v, and occasionally before consonantal i.

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek δῐ- (di-), from δίς (dís, twice, doubly).

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

di-

  1. Two, double; di-.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

English: di-

Malay edit

Etymology edit

From Early Old Malay ni-.

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

di- (Jawi spellingد-⁩)

  1. (third person) Patient focus, used in an OVA sentence.
    Pintu itu dibuka oleh ayah.
    That door was opened by dad.
    Pintu itu dibuka ayah.
    That door was opened by dad.

Usage notes edit

Frequently but erroneously called "passive voice", can optionally be accompanied with oleh, and is exclusively used in the third-person.

Derived terms edit

Navajo edit

Etymology 1 edit

Represents multiple homophonous thematic and aspectual prefixes of position I and VI, whose exact meaning and etymology remain mostly speculative.

Prefix edit

di- (position I)

  1. fire, near or into it

► Navajo verbs with disjunct prefix di-

di- (position VI)

Young and Morgan (1987) identify 14 or so thematic prefixes, among others:

  1. fire, light
  2. arms and legs
  3. extension, elongated shape
  4. noise, sound, oral, food, sensory
  5. color (see also dini-)
  6. relinquishment, relief
  7. sanctity
  8. Unclassified, often entering in the formation of other prefix compounds

Four modal-aspectual uses are also distinguished:

  1. Forms a number of inceptive verbs, with a (∅/si) paradigm.
  2. Forms a number of inchoative verbs, with prepounded dah and a transitional (yii/yii) paradigm.
  3. Forms the future mode of all active verbs along with the progressive yi-.
  4. Forms a number of neuter adjectivals.

► Navajo verbs with prefix di-

Etymology 2 edit

Probably cognate with a prefix of similar shape occurring in other Athabascan languages a reflexive possessive pronoun.

Probably cognate with classifier -d- marking passive and reflexive verbs.

Prefix edit

di- (position IV)

  1. Personal prefix used in combination with the prefix of position I à-, marking the reflexive verbs. It always triggers a classifier shift (d, łl).
    yishchʼidI'm scratching it
    nishchʼidI'm scratching you
    ádíshchʼidI'm scratching myself
    ánááshchʼidI'm scratching myself again

Northern Sotho edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *jí-. Originally the pronominal and verbal concord, it displaced the older Bantu noun prefix *bì-. The tone was lowered by analogy with other noun prefixes.

Prefix edit

di-

  1. Class 8 noun prefix.

Polish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin di-.

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

di-

  1. di-
    Synonyms: bi-, dwu-
    di- + ‎chromatyczny → ‎dichromatyczny

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • di- in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek δίς (dís, twice).

Prefix edit

di-

  1. di- (two, twice or double)

Derived terms edit

Sotho edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *jí-. Originally the pronominal and verbal concord, it displaced the older Bantu noun prefix *bì-. The tone was lowered by analogy with other noun prefixes.

Prefix edit

di-

  1. Class 8 noun prefix.

Spanish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Ancient Greek δίς (dís, twice).

Prefix edit

di-

  1. di-
    Synonyms: bi-, duo-
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin dis or Latin di.

Prefix edit

di-

  1. dis-
Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Tagalog edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Philippine *di.

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

dî- (Baybayin spelling ᜇᜒ)

  1. non-; un-; de-

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Tswana edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *jí-. Originally the pronominal and verbal concord, it displaced the older Bantu noun prefix *bì-. The tone was lowered by analogy with other noun prefixes.

Prefix edit

di-

  1. Class 8 noun prefix.

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

Proto-Celtic *dī- (from, of), from Proto-Indo-European *de. Cognate with Cornish di-.

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

di-

  1. intensifying prefix
    di- + ‎goddef → ‎dioddef
    di- + ‎golwch → ‎diolch
  2. without, -less, de-, a-, negative prefix
    Synonyms: af-, an-, dis-
    di- + ‎enw (name) → ‎dienw (anonymous)
    di- + ‎paid (pause, respite) → ‎di-baid (ceaseless, incessant)
    di- + ‎swydd (job, office) + ‎-o → ‎diswyddo (dismiss, discharge, sack, make redundant)

Usage notes edit

The negative prefix di- indicates a lack of something and is most often attached to a noun in a similar manner to English -less, e.g. dienw (anonymous, nameless), di-waith (unemployed (“workless”)), diobaith (hopeless). In contrast, af- and an- simply denote the negative form of the following root rather than the lack of it.

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
di- ddi- ni- unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “di-”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

West Makian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

di-

  1. third-person plural possessive prefix, their
    di omatheir children
  2. (polite) third-person singular possessive prefix, his, her
    mene de ti deto di musalathis is my grandmother's mat

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

di-

  1. (inanimate) alternative form of da- (its) when preceded by a root-initial i

See also edit

References edit

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[1], Pacific linguistics