English

edit

Etymology

edit

From Middle English dissolute, from Latin dissolutus.

Pronunciation

edit
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdɪsəljuːt/
  • Audio (US):(file)

Adjective

edit

dissolute (comparative more dissolute, superlative most dissolute)

  1. Unrestrained by morality.
  2. Recklessly abandoned to sensual pleasures.

Synonyms

edit

Derived terms

edit
edit

Translations

edit

Noun

edit

dissolute (plural dissolutes)

  1. An immoral person devoted to sensual pleasures.
    • 1879, The Quarterly Review, volume 148, page 263:
      [H]e illustrated the hypocrisy of his party; and was often known to exercise his talent of drinking a company of dissolutes under the table.

Anagrams

edit

Italian

edit

Adjective

edit

dissolute

  1. feminine plural of dissoluto

Noun

edit

dissolute f

  1. plural of dissoluta

Latin

edit

Participle

edit

dissolūte

  1. vocative masculine singular of dissolūtus

References

edit
  • dissolute”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dissolute”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dissolute in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.