abandoned

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English abandoned, equivalent to abandon +‎ -ed.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

abandoned (comparative more abandoned, superlative most abandoned)

  1. Having given oneself up to vice; immoral; extremely wicked, or sinning without restraint; irreclaimably wicked. [First attested from 1350 to 1470][1]
    • 1876, Alexander Davidson, A Complete History of Illinois from 1673 to 1884, page 232:
      Such immunity to offenders offered a safe asylum to the vilest and most abandoned scoundrels.
  2. No longer maintained by its former owners, residents, or caretakers; forsaken, deserted. [Late 15th century][1]
    • 1735, Thomson, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      [] your abandoned streams []
  3. Free from constraint; uninhibited. [Late 17th century][1]
  4. (geology) No longer being acted upon by the geologic forces that formed it.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

abandoned

  1. simple past tense and past participle of abandon

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 “abandoned”, in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, →ISBN, page 2.