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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin sensualis (endowed with feeling, sensual), from Latin sensus (feeling, sense).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsɛnsjuːəl/, /ˈsɛnʃuːəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈsɛn.ʃu.əl/

AdjectiveEdit

sensual (comparative more sensual, superlative most sensual)

  1. Inducing pleasurable and/or erotic sensations.
    That massage was a very sensual experience!
  2. (not comparable) Of or pertaining to the physical senses; sensory.
    Plato believed that this sensual world in which we live is inferior to the heavenly realm.
  3. Provoking or exciting a strong response in the senses.
    A sharp observer with a pleasing eye for sensual detail, Jaffrey weaves a richly textured story in which she effortlessly mingles quotidian dramas with historic events including the partition of India. —Michelle Green

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sensualis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sensual (masculine and feminine plural sensuals)

  1. sensual

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Late Latin sensualis, from Latin sensus.

AdjectiveEdit

sensual m, f (plural sensuais, comparable)

  1. Sexually attractive; sexy.

InflectionEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sensualis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /senˈswal/, [sẽnˈswal]

AdjectiveEdit

sensual (plural sensuales)

  1. sensual

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit