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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French douagere, douagiere, from douage (dower), from the verb douer (to endow), from Latin dōtāre (to endow), from dōs, dōtis ("dowry").

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dowager (plural dowagers)

  1. a widow holding property or title derived from her late husband
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter VI, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      “I don't mean all of your friends—only a small proportion—which, however, connects your circle with that deadly, idle, brainless bunch—the insolent chatterers at the opera, the gorged dowagers, the worn-out, passionless men, the enervated matrons of the summer capital, the chlorotic squatters on huge yachts, []!”
  2. any lady of dignified bearing

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