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See also: DOS, DoS, dós, dōs, do's, -dos, d'os, and d'ô

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

In dos and don'ts:

In music:

NounEdit

dos

  1. plural of do

AnagramsEdit


AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin duos, accusative of duo.

NumeralEdit

dos

  1. (cardinal) two

AsturianEdit

Asturian cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos
    Ordinal : segundu

EtymologyEdit

From Latin duōs, accusative form of duo.

NumeralEdit

dos (indeclinable)

  1. (cardinal) two

CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan dos, from Latin duōs, accusative form of duo (two), from Proto-Italic *duō, from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

Catalan cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos
    Ordinal : segon
    Multiplier : doble
Catalan Wikipedia article on dos

dos m (feminine dues)

  1. (cardinal) two
Usage notesEdit
  • Catalan cardinal numbers may be used as masculine or feminine adjectives, except un/una (1), dos/dues (2), cents/centes (100s) and its compounds. When used as nouns, Catalan cardinal numbers are treated as masculine singular nouns in most contexts, but in expressions involving time such as la una i trenta (1:30) or les dues (two o'clock), they are feminine because the feminine noun hora has been elided.
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

dos m (plural dosos)

  1. two

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dos

  1. plural of do

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Catalan dos, from Old Occitan, from Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum (back). Compare dors, a borrowed doublet.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dos m (plural dossos)

  1. Archaic form of dors.
Derived termsEdit

FalaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese dos, from de + os.

PrepositionEdit

dos m pl (singular dos, feminine da, feminine plural das)

  1. contraction of de (of) + os (the)
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Theme I, Chapter 1: Lengua Española:
      Esti términu Mañegu, o mais pequenu dos tres, formaba parti, con términus de Vilamel i Trevellu, da pruvincia de Salamanca hasta o anu 1833 []
      This San Martinese locality, the smallest of the three, formed, along with the Vilamen and Trevejo localities, the Salamanca province until the year 1833 []

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dos, from Latin dorsum (through a Vulgar Latin *dossum). Compare Romansch dies, Italian dosso, and Romanian dos.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dos m (plural dos)

  1. (anatomy) back (of a person)
  2. (in the plural) backs (of persons)
  3. backstroke

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From contraction of preposition de (of, from) + masculine plural definite article os (the). Akin to Portuguese dos (de + os).

PronunciationEdit

ContractionEdit

dos m pl (masculine do, feminine da, feminine plural das)

  1. of the; from the

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish doss (bush, thicket, tree).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dos m (genitive singular dois, nominative plural dosanna)

  1. tuft

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dos dhos ndos
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

KristangEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese dois, from Latin duōs, masculine accusative of duo.

NumeralEdit

dos

  1. (cardinal) two

LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin duos, accusative of duo.

NumeralEdit

dos (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling דוס)

  1. (cardinal) two

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *dōtis, from Proto-Indo-European *déh₃tis, from the root *deh₃- (give).

Cognate with Ancient Greek δόσις (dósis).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dōs f (genitive dōtis); third declension

  1. dowry
  2. gift, endowment, talent

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative dōs dōtēs
genitive dōtis dōtum
dative dōtī dōtibus
accusative dōtem dōtēs
ablative dōte dōtibus
vocative dōs dōtēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • dos in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dos in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dos in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • dos in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to give a dowry to one's daughter: dotem filiae dare
  • dos in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dos in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

LatvianEdit

VerbEdit

dos

  1. 3rd person singular future indicative form of dot
  2. 3rd person plural future indicative form of dot

MalayEdit

NounEdit

dos (plural dos-dos)

  1. dose

Middle WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dos

  1. second-person singular imperative of mynet

MutationEdit

Middle Welsh mutation
Radical Soft Nasal Aspirate
dos ðos nos unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dos, from Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum.

NounEdit

dos m (plural dos)

  1. (Jersey, anatomy) back (of a person)

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum.

NounEdit

dos m (oblique plural dos, nominative singular dos, nominative plural dos)

  1. (anatomy) back

DescendantsEdit

  • French: dos
  • Norman: dos (Jersey)
  • Walloon: dos

Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin duos, accusative of duo.

NumeralEdit

dos

  1. two (2)

DescendantsEdit


PapiamentuEdit

Papiamentu cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese dois and Spanish dos and Kabuverdianu dos.

NumeralEdit

dos

  1. (cardinal) two (2)



PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

ContractionEdit

dos

  1. Contraction of de os.; of the; from the (masculine plural)
    dos Santos
    of the Saints

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:do.

See alsoEdit

  • do (singular form)
  • das (feminine form)
  • da (singular feminine form)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum. Compare French dos and Romansch dies.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dos n (plural dosuri)

  1. back
  2. bottom, behind, buttocks
  3. reverse
  4. backside, rear
  5. tails (on a coin)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

  • (back): spate
  • (bottom, behind, buttocks): fund

SpanishEdit

Spanish cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos
    Ordinal : segundo
    Multiplier : doble

EtymologyEdit

From Latin duōs, accusative of duo, from Proto-Italic *duō, from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁. Cognates include Ancient Greek δύο (dúo), Old English twa (English two), Persian دو.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

dos

  1. (cardinal) two

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dos c

  1. dose (of medication)

TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish dos.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

dos

  1. two

SynonymsEdit


WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dos, from Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum.

NounEdit

dos m

  1. (anatomy) back

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dos

  1. (North Wales) second-person singular imperative of mynd

SynonymsEdit

  • cer (South Wales)

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dos ddos nos unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.