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See also: Dame, damé, dáme, and Damɛ

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
English actress Dame Judi Dench at the 60th British Academy Film Awards in February 2007. Dench was appointed Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1988, and thus uses the title “Dame” (sense 1)

From Middle English dame, dam ((term of address or title of a) woman of rank, lady; mistress of a household; superior of a convent; mother), from Old French dame (lady; term of address for a woman; the queen in card games and chess), from Latin domina (mistress of the house),[1] feminine form of dominus (lord, master, ruler; owner of a residence), ultimately either from Proto-Indo-European *demh₂- (to domesticate, tame) or from Latin domus (home, house) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build (up))). Doublet of donna.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dame (plural dames)

  1. (Britain) Usually capitalized as Dame: a title equivalent to Sir for a female knight.
    Dame Edith Sitwell
  2. (Britain) A matron at Eton College.
  3. (Britain, theater) In traditional pantomime: a melodramatic female often played by a man in drag.
  4. (US, dated, informal, slightly derogatory) A woman.
  5. (archaic) A lady, a woman.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ dāme, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 16 February 2018.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French dame (lady).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /daːmə/, [ˈd̥æːmə], [ˈd̥æːm̩]

NounEdit

dame c (singular definite damen, plural indefinite damer)

  1. lady
  2. woman
  3. (informal) girlfriend
  4. (card games) queen

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Playing cards in Danish · kort, spillekort (layout · text)
             
es toer treer firer femmer sekser syver
             
otter nier tier knægt, bonde dame, dronning konge joker

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French dame, from Latin domina.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: da‧me

NounEdit

dame f (plural dames, diminutive dametje n)

  1. lady
  2. (chess) queen

See alsoEdit

Chess pieces in Dutch · schaakstukken (schaak + stukken) (layout · text)
           
koning koningin, dame toren loper paard pion

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dame, from Late Latin domna, shortened variant of Latin domina.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dame f (plural dames)

  1. A lady
  2. A polite form of address for a woman.
  3. (chess) queen
  4. (card games) queen

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Chess pieces in French · pièces d'échecs (layout · text)
           
roi dame tour fou cavalier pion
Playing cards in French · cartes à jouer (layout · text)
             
as deux trois quatre cinq six sept
             
huit neuf dix valet dame roi joker

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

dame f

  1. plural of dama

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

dame

  1. Rōmaji transcription of だめ

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin domina, via Old French dame and late Old Norse damma.

NounEdit

dame f, m (definite singular dama or damen, indefinite plural damer, definite plural damene)

  1. a lady, woman
  2. (card games) a queen

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin domina, via Old French dame and late Old Norse damma.

NounEdit

dame f (definite singular dama, indefinite plural damer, definite plural damene)

  1. a lady, woman
  2. (card games) a queen

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin domna, shortened variant of Latin domina.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dame f (oblique plural dames, nominative singular dame, nominative plural dames)

  1. lady; woman

Usage notesEdit

  • Unlike in modern French, fame usually refers to a wife, while dame refers to a woman.

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

dame

  1. Compound of the informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of dar, da and the pronoun me: give me!