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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English dubytacion.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) enPR: dyo͞obĭtāʹshən, IPA(key): /djuːbɪˈteɪʃən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌdu.bɪˈteɪ.ʃən/, /ˌdju.bɪˈteɪ.ʃən/
  • (file)

NounEdit

dubitation (usually uncountable, plural dubitations)

  1. (uncountable, archaic) The process of doubting or the state of being in doubt; hesitation, uncertainty.
    • circa 1450, Coventry Mystery Plays, page 67 (Shakespeare Society; published 1841–53):
      I [] Alle that my progenitouris hath [] seyn, ffeythfully beleve withowtyn alle dubytacion.
    • 1570, George Buchanan, Chamæleon, page 51:
      The Chamæleon [] eftir sum dubitatioun come to Striueling.
    • 1867, George MacDonald, Annals of a Quiet Neighbourhood, chapter 32:
      All my dubitation and distress were gone, for I had something to do, although what I could not yet tell.
  2. (countable, obsolete) A thing to be doubted; a matter that calls for doubt.
    • 1545, George Joye, The Exposicion of Daniel the Prophete, chapter 12:
      The trewe inuocacion of God thorow Cryst, thei haue turned it into a dowtfull dubitacion.
  3. (countable) A pang or expression of doubt.
    • 1683, John Pordage (author) and Edward Hooker (editor), Theologica Mystica, or The Mystic Divinitie of the Æternal Invisibles, page 99:
      Altercations, disputations and dubitations of, in and about Mystic Theologie.
    • 1841, Thomas Carlyle, Heroes and Hero Worship, chapter 4:
      [T]he deep earnest soul of the man had fallen into all manner of black scruples, dubitations; he believed himself likely to die soon, and far worse than die.
    • 1864, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, Wylder’s Hand, chapter 43:
      These terrors and dubitations are infectious.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin dubitātiō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dubitation f (plural dubitations)

  1. (literary) dubitation: the action of putting in doubt, or a state of doubt
  2. (rhetoric) a figure of speech, a passage in which a writer or speaker expresses or feigns doubt, for example to forestall objections

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

dubitation” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin dubitātiō.

NounEdit

dubitation f (oblique plural dubitations, nominative singular dubitation, nominative plural dubitations)

  1. doubt
    • 1377, Bernard de Gordon, Fleur de lis de medecine (a.k.a. lilium medicine), page 183 of this essay:
      Decy la seconde dubitacion se le lepre est maladie de tout le corps
      From this, the second doubt over whether leprosy is a disease of all the body