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EnglishEdit

 
A plate of dulse.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Irish duileasc, Scottish Gaelic duileasg; compare Welsh delysg.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dulse (usually uncountable, plural dulses)

  1. A seaweed of a reddish-brown color (Palmaria palmata) which is sometimes eaten, as in Scotland.
    • 1997, ‘Egil's Saga’, tr. Bernard Scudder, The Sagas of Icelanders, Penguin 2001, page 151:
      Then Egil said, ‘That happens if you eat dulse, it makes you even thirstier.’
    • 2002, Joseph O'Connor, Star of the Sea, Vintage 2003, page 90:
      They worked together on their father's patch: desperately, hungrily, from dawn to nightfall; dragging up dulse from the shore to nourish the stones; [...] but nothing much grew except their own sense of separation.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish dulce (candy, sweets, dessert), from Latin dulcis.

NounEdit

dulse

  1. (dated) candy, sweets

SynonymsEdit


LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dulcis (compare Spanish dulce).

AdjectiveEdit

dulse ? (Latin spelling)

  1. sweet, sugary

NounEdit

dulse m (Latin spelling)

  1. sweet preserves