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See also: econòmic

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French economique, from Latin oeconomicus, from Ancient Greek οικονομικός (oikonomikós, skilled with household management).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

economic (comparative more economic, superlative most economic)

  1. Pertaining to an economy.
    • 2013 August 3, “Boundary problems”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. GDP measures the total value of output in an economic territory. Its apparent simplicity explains why it is scrutinised down to tenths of a percentage point every month.
  2. Frugal; cheap (in the sense of representing good value); economical.
  3. Pertaining to the study of money and its movement.

Usage notesEdit

Modern usage prefers economic when describing the economy of a region or country (and when referring to personal or family budgeting).
Economical is preferred when referring to thrift or value for money.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LadinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

economic m pl

  1. plural of economich

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French économique.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

economic m, n (feminine singular economică, masculine plural economici, feminine and neuter plural economice)

  1. economic
  2. economical

DeclensionEdit